The Strange Afterlife of Antonio Gramsci: How the Italian Marxist Has Influenced Both Left and Right

By Eaton, George | New Statesman (1996), February 2, 2018 | Go to article overview

The Strange Afterlife of Antonio Gramsci: How the Italian Marxist Has Influenced Both Left and Right


Eaton, George, New Statesman (1996)


At the trial of Antonio Gramsci in 1928, the prosecutor declared: "We must stop this brain from working for 20 years." Gramsci, the former leader of the Italian Communist Party and a gifted Marxist theoretician and journalist, was sentenced to two decades' imprisonment by Benito Mussolini's fascist government.

Yet confinement marked the flowering, rather than the decay, of Gramsci's thought. He embarked on an epic intellectual pursuit with the aim of an enduring legacy. His Prison Notebooks, as they became known, comprised 33 volumes and 3,000 pages of history, philosophy, economics and revolutionary strategy. Though permitted to write, Gramsci was denied access to Marxist works and was forced to use code to evade the prison censors. In 1937, having long been refused adequate health care (his teeth fell out and he was unable to digest solid foods), Gramsci died, aged 46.

Yet he has achieved the intellectual afterlife that he sought. Gramsci's Prison Notebooks were smuggled out by his sister-in-law Tatiana and published in Italy from 1948-51. After Gramsci's work was translated into French, German and English in the 1970s, he became the foremost influence on the anti-Stalinist Eurocommunists. Gramsci is now quoted routinely by commentators who recall his most memorable aphorism ("pessimism of the intellect, optimism of the will") and his description of the 1930s: "The crisis consists precisely in the fact that the old is dying and the new cannot be born; in this interregnum a great variety of morbid symptoms appear."

In a 2013 speech, Michael Gove, then education secretary, cited Gramsci in defence of his emphasis on traditional teaching methods ("the ideology he [Gramsci] so feared in inter-war Italy was what we have come to call--with tragic inappropriateness--progressive education"). Gramsci was even claimed by the French far-right group Nouvelle Droite and its Belgian counterpart Vlaams Blok. What accounts for this strange, contested legacy?

The defining Gramscian concept is that of hegemony. This denotes a level of political domination that extends beyond control of a state or a parliament into the realm of culture and ideas. Gramsci was preoccupied by the question of why the 1917 Russian revolution had not been followed by others in western Europe. He located the answer in the persistence of capitalist ideas among civil society institutions (political parties, trade unions, churches, the media). As he wrote: "The state was only an outer ditch, behind which there stood a powerful system of fortresses."

It was insufficient, Gramsci argued, for revolutionaries to merely wage a "war of movement" (as the Bolsheviks did with their seizure of the Russian state), they had to fight a "war of position": a long struggle on the terrain of civil society with the aim of changing what the writer called "common sense" (or the "philosophy of non-philosophers"). …

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