Practical Ways to Incorporate New Technology Trends

Library Technology Reports, February-March 2018 | Go to article overview

Practical Ways to Incorporate New Technology Trends


So far, we have discussed reasons to stay on top of technology trends and how that affects libraries. We have also identified some technology trend watchers, explored how to follow them, and learned why it's useful to watch for emerging trends.

In this chapter, we take a look at how to incorporate new technology trends into your library. There are at least four aspects to consider when incorporating new technology trends into your library:

1. developing a plan

2. learning from library early adopters

3. conducting a technology process review

4. dealing with technology overload

Let's examine each of these areas in more detail.

Developing a Plan

As you start to trend watch, you will find new technology that you would like to purchase and incorporate into your library's technology offerings or infrastructure. You might discover technology that you can roll into an already existing service, or you may find something to help jump-start a new program, a service, or even a new library department.

Your library's strategic plan might provide guidance for exploring and incorporating new technology into the library. For example, one of my library's strategic plan goals (from a previous strategic plan) was to "support and nourish the community spirit, imagination, and culture." (1) This strategic initiative can be connected to multiple technology strategies, including purchasing more creative technology tools or using more participatory tools like online polls or surveys.

Let's take a look at how to incorporate an emerging technology trend in a library setting, using a current library trend--digital media labs--as an example.

Here are the steps we will explore:

* Learn about the trend and its potential benefits.

* Share the vision with management (and get permission).

* Research community interest.

* Create the plan.

* Start small.

Learn about the Trend

In the first two chapters, I highlighted effective ways to learn about trends. You now know how to use trend-watching tools to discover emerging library technology trends. If you have had these tools set up in the last couple of years, you probably have heard about digital media labs in libraries (see figure 3.1).

A digital media lab is a technology-focused space in a library where customers can create and manipulate digital content--like music, podcasts, photographs, videos, digital art, and graphic design. A digital media lab usually has a mix of hardware, software, and space dedicated to digital content creation. Tools and software usually include Macs and PCs with software like Adobe's Creative Suite and Apple's GarageBand. There are often microphones, digital audio interfaces, MIDI keyboards, guitars, and digital drawing tablets that are included as peripheral hardware that can be used in the space. Some libraries have gone further and have created complete recording studios, video creation spaces, and multimedia art learning labs.

How would you learn more about building a digital media lab in your library? Trend watching is a great place to start. You would also need to do some more in-depth research to determine how to set up a digital media lab in a library and to identify benefits of incorporating a digital media lab into your institution.

A great way to learn more about digital media labs is to visit a library's website to read about their space. For example, you might visit my library's Make-It-Lab page (see figure 3.2) and read about the services and equipment we offer our customers. Some other web-pages to visit include the following:

* Skokie Public Library's Digital Media Labs

* Johnson County Library's MakerSpace

* Kansas City Public Library's Digital Media Lab

* North Carolina State University Libraries' Makerspace

* University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries' Digital Media Lab

* University of California San Diego Library's Digital Media Lab

Each of these websites provides more information about the equipment and services each library makes available to its patrons. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Practical Ways to Incorporate New Technology Trends
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.