PWRDF Leads Food Distribution Project in South Sudan

By Kidd, Joelle | Anglican Journal, February 2018 | Go to article overview

PWRDF Leads Food Distribution Project in South Sudan


Kidd, Joelle, Anglican Journal


Nateba Lokorio, a single mother who cares for her two daughters, her mother and her two elderly aunts in the rural county of Kapoeta North in South Sudan, said she received a "wonderful" gift in December: "My household is now guaranteed a meal each day of the week."

This was made possible by a food distribution project lee the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) in the state of Eastern Equatoria that it said benefitted 1,799 South Sudanese households --8,960 individuals.

The project, which had a budget of $375,024, was funded through PWRDF's equity in Canadian Foodgrains Bank, a 4:1 match from Global Affairs Canada and a contribution of $100,000 from the United Church of Canada. PWRDF is the relief and development agency of the Anglican Church of Canada.

The county of Kapoeta North, populated by the agro-pastoralist Toposa tribe, lies in an arid zone, said PWRDF humanitarian response co-ordinator Naba Gurung. Among the reasons Kapoeta was chosen for the project, he said, was that the food security situation in the county was described as critical, because of two consecutive years of minimal rainfall that led to crop failure.

Prolonged armed conflict in South Sudan continues to hamper food security in the country, where the effects of drought have been amplified by war, displacement and economic hardship.

Food staples such as sorghum, maize (corn) and wheat flour have increased in pr n South Sudan by up to 281% compared to 2016, according to a joint release by UNICEF, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the UN World Food Program. …

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