It Took 'Life Sentence' to Get Lucy Hale Back to Work; by Rick Bentley

By Service, Tribune News | The Florida Times Union, March 14, 2018 | Go to article overview

It Took 'Life Sentence' to Get Lucy Hale Back to Work; by Rick Bentley


Service, Tribune News, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Tribune News Service

LOS ANGELES -- Lucy Hale was ready for a break. She had just spent seven seasons on the hugely popular "Pretty Little Liars." The last thing she was thinking about was doing another TV series.

Then she got the script for "Life Sentence."

"I thought it was a really important story to tell," Hale says. "I wanted to be the girl who told that story. It came as a surprise to me that I signed on to do something so quickly but with me, if something resonates then I have to go do it. It's not every day that you read something you fall in love with.

"I have never been more proud of anything in my life. This series reminded me of what I love to do."

The story that pulled Hale back to work so quickly has her playing Stella, a young woman who has spent the last eight years living each day as if it could be her last because of a battle with cancer. She traveled the world, faced her darkest fears and found true love on a whirlwind trip to Paris. But the story doesn't end there. It airs at 9 p.m. Wednesdays on the CW network.

Stella's cancer has been cured, and now she must face the long-term consequences of the decisions she made, including marrying a total stranger. At the same time, she leans on those around her who have been living their own lies just to keep Stella from knowing the truth.

"All these things were hidden from Stella. She did live in a fantasy world. Her family tried to give her the best last years of her life. So you later find out that her family's about as dysfunctional as they come," Hale says. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

It Took 'Life Sentence' to Get Lucy Hale Back to Work; by Rick Bentley
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.