Cyberwise Private Eyes

By Jones, Joyce; Muhammad, Tariq K. | Black Enterprise, December 1998 | Go to article overview

Cyberwise Private Eyes


Jones, Joyce, Muhammad, Tariq K., Black Enterprise


Cyveillance protects copyright and trademark rights on the Internet

Often called the new frontier, the World Wide Web conforms to few rules, including copyright and trademark regulations. These laws, which protect the unauthorized use, transmission and sale of materials registered to a company or individual in the real world, have struggled to keep up in the virtual world. As the federal government takes the slow road to Internet regulation, cyber-opportunists are making a profit by illegally using protected material on their Web sites. However, Cyveillance, an Internet surveillance company, is protecting businesses from infringement when the government can't--or won't.

"We haven't come across many Fortune 1000 companies for which we can't find hundreds of violations of their copyrighted or trademarked material," says Brandy Thomas, chairman and CEO of the Alexandria, Virginia-based company. "Over 90% of U.S.-based entertainment companies and more than 80% of Fortune 1000 companies are victims of copyright and trademark abuses on the Internet."

Infractions run the gamut from the illegal and unauthorized use, sale and distribution of licensed information and material to the immoral use of trademarked characters and logos. "We found over 800 sites distributing Titanic before the Academy Awards--nearly six months before its official video release," says 30-year-old Thomas, who's able to get copies of most movies on the Net before they've even been released to theaters.

The proliferation of pirated movies on the Net prompted Cyveillance's first client, the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), to enlist the company's services in August 1997. "We started with a focus on the entertainment industry, but we found that almost every company has a need for our product," explains company president and COO Christopher Young. Cyveillance has a three-pronged strategy for servicing its clients: help them generate additional streams of revenue through licensing; limit liability exposure due to unauthorized use of company property; and prevent lost revenue from unauthorized sales. Other companies that have benefited from Cyveillance's services include the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), the National Basketball Association, the Recording Industry Association of America, Software Publishers Association and Time Inc.-New Media.

"We're really the only shop out there that can give them quantitative and qualitative information about what's happening on the Net," states Thomas. Cyveillance uses WebSentry, a patent-pending technology program developed by Thomas' brother Jason, the company's senior vice president of technology. The program allows them to search the Internet to identify, monitor and prioritize information in four areas: electronic commerce, copyright and trademark, pornography and perception.

It builds a comprehensive list from Web pages and Usenet groups, then filters and prioritizes that information. Once WebSentry refines and synthesizes what it has found into easy-to-read reports, clients then use the information to ask offending sites to cease and desist, pay a copyright or licensing fee or face prosecution--or the client may take no action at all.

ASCAP, the world's largest performing rights organization, enlisted Cyveillance to create EZ-Seeker, a custom program that deals specifically with Web sites that play unlicensed music. "The Web is an exciting new venue for performances of music, but finding those unlicensed sites that are performing music and generating licenses for them is a challenge," says ASCAP senior vice president of new media and strategic planning Marc Morgenstern. "EZ-Seeker is a terrific tool for accomplishing all that. It's a prospecting, monitoring and licensing tool all in one, and functions like no other product." That uniqueness has put Cyveillance on track to earn over $1 million in 1998--its first full year of operation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cyberwise Private Eyes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.