Gender Pay Gap: 78% of Firms Paying Men More Than Women

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), April 5, 2018 | Go to article overview

Gender Pay Gap: 78% of Firms Paying Men More Than Women


Nearly eight out of 10 companies and public sector bodies pay men more than women as the deadline passed for organisations to report their gender pay gaps.

Businesses with 250 employees or more were required to submit the data on mean and median gender pay gaps to the Government Equalities Office by midnight on Wednesday.

Companies who fail to provide data face legal action and there was a last-minute dash to file the information before the deadline - with more than 15% sending their information between Tuesday at 4pm and the cut-off point.

More than 10,000 companies submitted their data, with 78% of the 10,015 firms having a pay gap in favour of men.

The rest of the employers either have no median gender pay gap (8%) or one in favour of women (14%).

Ryanair is one of the best-known companies in the top 10 of those with the worst gender pay gap, along with the holding company for Millwall FC.

The airline pays women 71.8% less than men on average - when comparing median hourly rates, for every [pounds sterling]1 men earn, women earn just 28p.

It says the disparity is because of the number of UK pilots it employs - 546 are male and only eight are female.

Millwall Holdings PLC reported a median gender pay gap of 80%, compared to an average across all companies who have submitted data of 12%.

Meanwhile, a handful of employers have already filed figures for the 2018/19 financial year, including the Conservative Party's campaign headquarters, which has reported a gender pay gap in favour of women of 15.7%.

The Tories did not publish a figure for 2017/18 as the party's campaign HQ did not employ 250 or more employees. That threshold has now been passed, however.

Labour has reported a gender pay gap of 4.0% in favour of men, but this snapshot was taken on April 5 2017, and is not directly comparable with the Conservatives' figure which is a snapshot as of April 5 2018. …

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