The Skills Level of Jordanian Teachers' Basic Education in the Area of Instructional Media

By El-Hmaisat, Hamad | International Journal of Instructional Media, Summer 1998 | Go to article overview

The Skills Level of Jordanian Teachers' Basic Education in the Area of Instructional Media


El-Hmaisat, Hamad, International Journal of Instructional Media


INTRODUCTION

Jordan is a section of the Arab world which is considered one of the most advanced developed countries in the Arab world. The ministry of education has committed a major investment of dollars in the area of Instructional Technology. It has established various learning resource centers in each governate in the country and conducted workshops to train teachers in order to enhance their learning and improve the teaching and learning in the government schools.

The public Community College has offered a two year training program in the area of instructional media and library science. In addition, the college of educational science within the public universities, are offering several courses in the area of instructional media. This is an important source "Media technology enhance instruction by displaying events and things that took place in the past, that are small to see, too large too transport, to complex to understand, or even things that cannot be seen at all." (More, Wilson, and Armisted, 1986).

RELATED STUDIES

Many studies conducted in the area of instructional technology investigated the impact of training on teachers skills in the area of instructional media. El - Hmaisat. (1989, P. 196) found that one of the barriers facing the teachers in the elementary schools was the lack of training in instructional media. Bowies (1985) indicated that the use of instructional media technology have certainly proven to be a powerful educational tool due to its capacity to involve students in their own learning; to capture students attention and to extend theft minds and to broaden the overall school experience of young people. Many studies found that preservice teachers who have taken formal training in the area of instructional media were positively influenced toward their selection and use. It was reported that formal training produced the necessary intellectual and motor skills to create a positive attitude toward the selection and utilization of instructional media Kelley (1959), Cole, (1964), Wheller, (1969), Jenkins (1972) and Long (1974) Also, Fulton and White (1959), Rome (1973) Lare (1974), Jones (1982) have identified media skills and competencies in use or recommended by inservice educational personnel including classroom teachers, administration and college instruction. The same relates to methods courses as well as instructional media faculty. Engstorm (1981) stated that, as teacher become more skilled with technology and using it to enrich and challenge traditional pedagogy, they discover new ways of the thinking about teaching and learning. Also, he identified competencies which teacher and school staff should attain. The teacher must attain skills in designing and developing materials that are specific to learning needs for students. Although, the preparation of the teachers in the use of media, may take place informally, most teachers will have to rely upon other sources for training.

Koontz (1992) in his study noted that the majority of teachers who used media had little or no training in the use of technology. Cropp (1990) indicated that media is an important component for teacher effectiveness and that teacher preparation programs should require an understanding of the instructional media prior to certification.

The above studies illustrate the importance of instructional media in the learning teaching processes as well as it's importance to pre and inservice training for teachers in the schools.

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY

The study aimed at investigating the skill level of teachers in basic education in the area of producing instructional media and operating different types of instructional media equipment.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE STUDY

The study will define the skill level of the teacher, at the basic level, in the area of production and the operation of instructional media equipment. It will also provide information for the decision makers to design the necessary training and workshop programs for inservice teachers in the area of instructional media. …

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