Rutgers V. Waddington: Alexander Hamilton, the End of the War for Independence, and the Origins of Judicial Review

By Morser, Eric J. | The Historian, Spring 2018 | Go to article overview

Rutgers V. Waddington: Alexander Hamilton, the End of the War for Independence, and the Origins of Judicial Review


Morser, Eric J., The Historian


Rutgers v. Waddington: Alexander Hamilton, the End of the War for Independence, and the Origins of Judicial Review. By Peter Charles Hoffer. (Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2016. Pp. vii, 152. $18.95.)

In this smart and slim volume, the author makes a convincing argument that scholars need to pay greater mind to Rutgers v. Waddington, a complex and twisting legal case decided in New York City in 1784, in order to understand the origins of judicial review and the evolving sense of national identity in the United States. Peter Charles Hoffer begins his story in revolutionary-era Gotham, a city captured by the British in 1776, which remained their base of operations throughout the war. Although the British did not treat New York like conquered territory, they did encourage merchant Joshua Waddington and other Loyalist supporters to confiscate and operate businesses like the Rutgers brewhouse as the conflict raged on. Not surprisingly, Loyalists garnered little sympathy from their patriotic neighbors when the Revolution turned in favor of the Americans. Beginning in the late 1770s, state lawmakers passed legislation to punish British sympathizers. One of these provisions was the 1783 Trespass Act, which gave Patriots the right to sue Loyalists for damages related to property confiscated during the war. This new law soon sparked a heated legal debate when the Rutgers tavern mysteriously went up in flames in November of 1783.

Enter Alexander Hamilton, a talented young attorney deeply concerned about the survival of his young nation. In his mind, reintegrating former Loyalists was an important step in securing the United States. But he also believed something else that had perhaps deeper implications for the nation's future: The Trespass Act's effort to punish Loyalists violated the 1783 treaty that had brought the war to a close and included a promise that Americans would protect the property rights of British subjects. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Rutgers V. Waddington: Alexander Hamilton, the End of the War for Independence, and the Origins of Judicial Review
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.