Mcas Miramar Is off and Running

By Grant, Wendy M. | Parks & Recreation, December 1998 | Go to article overview

Mcas Miramar Is off and Running


Grant, Wendy M., Parks & Recreation


A 5K run at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar is more than a mere dash for the finish line. As the Marine Corps is constantly focused on fitness as an element of military readiness, marines pack the fitness center and the running course daily. So, when the station's Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Athletics Department plans a running event, it has to be more exciting than your average run if it's going to draw a crowd. In addition to encouraging marines to complete yet another run, Miramar's unique running events attract military spouses and children, retirees, and civilian employees who work at the air station.

The need for speed is nonexistent at Miramar's Las Vegas Fun Run/Walk. Participants run or walk the 3.4-mile course, picking up playing cards along the way. It doesn't matter when participants cross the finish line; what matters is the cards each person holds upon crossing the finish line. Those with the top three hands win great prizes, first place being a weekend trip to Las Vegas. This event annually attracts more than 150 people.

Runners and walkers flock to Miramar's Turkey Trot, which is held each November. The top three finishers in this race receive trophies topped with a turkey decked out in running shoes. Speed is not the only quality required of winners at the Turkey Trot -- luck plays a big role as well. All participants are entered into a drawing for holiday goodies. Ten turkeys, 10 hams, and 30 pies are distributed among the more than 150 annual Turkey Trot participants.

Civilians have a chance to take off on MCAS Miramar's runways each August. The military F/A-18 Hornet jets and other aircraft make way for runners and cyclists during the annual Runway 10K and Flight Line Bike Classic. …

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