Faculty Object to Shared San Jose Library

By Goldberg, Beverly | American Libraries, December 1998 | Go to article overview

Faculty Object to Shared San Jose Library


Goldberg, Beverly, American Libraries


The passage of a $9.5-billion education bond measure by California voters on November 3 (see p. 14-16), some $86 million of which was earmarked for capital improvements to San Jose State University, has brought approval one step closer for a plan to build a joint university-main public library facility on campus (AL, Oct., p. 21). But even as the Academic Senate was preparing to send their own advisory vote to the city council in early December, a group of concerned SJSU faculty members were trying to convince their colleagues of the plan's inimicability to their academic lives.

More than 200 students and faculty attended a campus rally October 14 to show their opposition to the $171-million joint-use facility. The rally was organized by Save Our University Library (SOUL), which began its campaign in August to dissuade the Academic Senate from approving the plan. By early November, SOUL had collected some 300 faculty and 2,700 student signatures on anti-merger petitions.

"While we believe that university and public libraries both have important functions, they are different and cannot be easily merged," SOUL co-founder and history professor E. Bruce Reynolds told American Libraries. In particular, Reynolds worries that students will be "particularly disadvantaged" by having to vie for access to course-related materials with San Jose's 800,000 residents and enduring "watered down" reference service that caters to the lowest common denominator of user sophistication.

Reynolds said that "the city wants to be rid of the existing main library, which is on valuable land in front of the convention center. Also, by claiming full access to our collection the city politicians can claim they have, without any real cost to voters, solved the city's long-standing library collection deficiencies."

Just as "professors might like to think they know how to run a library" since they have patronized them for years, city librarian Jane Light quipped that she might be qualified to run a university's academic department using such logic. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Faculty Object to Shared San Jose Library
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.