The Center for Indigenous Nursing Research for Health Equity: Creating Opportunities for Nurses and Giving Respect to Tradition

By Moore, Elizabeth | American Nurse Today, March 2018 | Go to article overview

The Center for Indigenous Nursing Research for Health Equity: Creating Opportunities for Nurses and Giving Respect to Tradition


Moore, Elizabeth, American Nurse Today


With the stirring music and sacred smoke of a traditional Native American blessing, the first indigenous nursing research center in the world was dedicated in May 2017 at the Florida State University (FSU) College of Nursing in Tallahassee, Florida. Led by Executive Director John Lowe, PhD, RN, FAAN, the Center for Indigenous Nursing Research for Health Equity (INRHE) aims to attain health equity through research, education, and service by partnering with indigenous peoples, communities, organizations, and supporters globally.

Lowe, who is the McKenzie Endowed Professor for Health Disparities Research at FSU, envisions the center developing "a strong unity among global nurses" who are working to increase health equity in native communities. Lowe has spent his career exploring health disparities and inequities in indigenous communities and studying cultural practices and traditions that have proven helpful in alleviating the effects of those disparities.

Health equity goes further than eliminating health disparity. "Just because we reduce disparities [in indigenous populations] doesn't mean we are optimizing health," said Lowe, a Florida Nurses Association member. "As indigenous or Native American people, we believe health equity is an inherent right," he explained. "Our ancestors sacrificed land, lives, and culture so that their descendants could have what was promised through treaties and other means. But we were left with inequities and disparities. This context is important to why we strive for health equity."

The estimated worldwide population of indigenous people is 370 million; they belong to 5,000 different groups and speak about 4,000 languages. The INRHE center currently has projects in collaboration with multiple tribes in the United States and is developing projects with indigenous communities in Canada, Australia, Panama, and New Zealand.

Lowe would like to see the center build relationships with other health disciplines. And, he said, "We want to be a hub, not just for indigenous nurses, but for other nurses who know the issues." Connecting with indigenous populations globally also is critical, as they share common experiences with colonization and dispossession, he noted.

The center hosted the first International Indigenous Nursing Research Summit in May 2017. To ensure a broad array of viewpoints, the center's advisory board council is made up of indigenous and non-indigenous scholars from around the world.

Advisory Council Member Odette Best, PhD, RN, associate professor of nursing and midwifery at the University of Southern Queensland, called the summit the most empowering indigenous health conference she's ever attended. "This was due to Professor Lowe's ability to pull together global, indigenous nurses to present our research to fellow indigenous nurse researchers," said Best, who is an Aboriginal Australian.

Traditions and clinical practice can coexist

A Cherokee Native American, Lowe is one of just a few Native American male RNs and was honored in 2016 with the American Nurses Association's Luther Christman Award, which recognizes the achievements of men in nursing. While earning his BSN, MSN, and PhD, Lowe worked in clinics and provided nursing instruction around the United States and in Tanzania, China, Jamaica, and Costa Rica. He has received funding from the National Institutes of Health for his work on Native American substance abuse prevention, including an after-school substance abuse prevention intervention called the Intertribal Talking Circle, which has been acknowledged by the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Justice Programs as a Promising Evidence-Based Program for the well-being of youth.

The Talking Circle is an example of the culturally congruent interventions that INRHE center researchers will focus on. "Healthcare professionals should learn more about [indigenous or native] practices and learn to work with them," Lowe said. …

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