Integrative Medicine

By Weil, Andrew | Whole Earth, Winter 1998 | Go to article overview

Integrative Medicine


Weil, Andrew, Whole Earth


The speed with which medical institutions, including medical schools, are beginning to open to integrative medicine is astonishing and very gratifying. They're being forced into it. The institutions have no choice but to adapt; nonetheless it's nice to see. This change in medicine could be very important to society, going way beyond developments like alternative therapies. To give one example: if physicians were educated about the relationship between the environment and health, and really came to appreciate environmental causes of illness, they could as a group be a very powerful force pushing for environmental protection and clean-up. A more conscious, more enlightened medical profession would be a strong agent for social changes within our culture.

Breast cancer and neurological diseases such as Parkinson's and ALS, for example, are going to turn out to be traceable to environmental toxins like endocrine disruptors. Doctors' educations now include none of this understanding of environmental toxins as a causation of disease. Physicians as a profession have been very apathetic and just haven't pushed for this, though they're the ones who should be most concerned about it.

It's how physicians are trained and also our culture's very reductionist thinking. It's the prejudice and bias of science in our culture to see natural products as inexact and want to reduce activity down to single compounds. Medical education really isolates people from nature. Students have no first-hand experience of it in their training and pick up the prejudice that nature is inexact and wild and uncontrolled and dangerous.

Other interactions of environment and health include evolution of new diseases, especially new bacterial strains, and other factors contributing to the weakening of human immunity and defenses. We'll have to see what happens with these new diseases, but there is reason to be worried. Integrative medicine looks at antibiotics, for instance, in several ways. First, it doesn't reject antibiotics totally, but tries to teach people when it's appropriate to use them. Second, it tries to strengthen the body's defenses rather than just attack the germs; that approach especially comes from Chinese medicine.

A few years ago, I was with a Japanese scientist whose field of research was herbal medicine. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Integrative Medicine
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.