Aurora Librarian Thrilled to Win a Seat on Young Adult Library Services Association

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 19, 2018 | Go to article overview

Aurora Librarian Thrilled to Win a Seat on Young Adult Library Services Association


Byline: Submitted by Amy Roth

Teens. Are they just older children, or younger adults?

According to YALSA, which is a division of the American Library Association and stands for Young Adult Library Services Association, teens are in a developmental stage that requires a unique approach to understanding them, connecting with them and serving them.

And, the needs of younger teens (ages 13 to 15) vary from those of older teens (ages 16 to 18).

Aurora Public Library is proud to announce that Selection Specialist Colleen Seisser has been elected to the YALSA Board of Directors for a three-year term as a director at large.

Seisser's position at the library includes selection of materials for teens at all library locations.

The Arlington Heights resident has been a YALSA member for 10 years. She joined even before she started library school. Her career in libraries started when she was a junior in high school. She worked as a shelver at Arlington Heights Memorial Public Library.

"I had five years of collection management and page activities. When I got my undergrad degree (in art history), I was going to look at museum work, but luckily, I got a job working in a middle school in Winnetka. That was where I was introduced to teen culture in libraries."

Seisser worked with Julie Halpern (now a young adult author) at the middle school.

"She opened my eyes," Seisser said. "I got more involved in programming and catering to teens' interests. I loved the literature that existed for teens and I really liked their interests, like crafting and playing games and doing fun pop culture programs.

"I couldn't relate to children's services or adult services. I feel very lucky to have discovered this. The original idea was for me to go into archival work and restoration. Then I found out, 'Oh, this exists? Teens? Duh!'"

Five months before receiving her master's degree in library and information science from Dominican University in 2009, Seisser was hired to work at Deerfield Public Library where she was tasked with creating the Young Adult Services department.

"I relied heavily on YALSA for direction on starting a Teen Advisory Board and for developing the collection," she said. "All they had were some books in their youth collection for up to eighth grade."

Although it was a tall order, Seisser said it was also "super exciting.

"It was my first job and I got to make it all," she said. "New librarian Colleen was chomping at the bit to do this."

Seisser worked for Karen Kleckner Keefe at Deerfield. She is now the executive director of Hinsdale Public Library.

"She was my first mentor. She supported me. It was easy to learn from her and succeed with her help. She was also the first person to direct me to YALSA. They have so many resources. Because there was no collection for teens, I went to YALSA's collection list for the last three to five years to see the best teen fiction, popular paperbacks and great graphic novels. On top of that, they had webinars for members to access. For someone who had never done a teen program before, it was great having someone there say, 'Here's how you do it.' They have an email list serve so you can be in touch with other teen librarians across the nation."

Because YALSA was so helpful to her, it was Seisser's goal to serve on committees. "I saw the resources and the people that I could connect with, and I wanted to stay involved," she said.

Her first assignment was on the Local Arrangements Committee for the ALA conference. The task was to put together arrangements for conference-goers who needed to know where to stay, where to eat, how to get around and interesting places to visit. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Aurora Librarian Thrilled to Win a Seat on Young Adult Library Services Association
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.