Paleontology in the National Park Service

By Voynick, Steve | The World and I, January 1999 | Go to article overview

Paleontology in the National Park Service


Voynick, Steve, The World and I


Every morning during the summer months, Herb Meyer begins his day by inspecting a small hillside excavation where college interns are busy recovering insect and leaf fossils. As park paleontologist at Colorado's Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument, Meyer is also in charge of identifying and cataloging new fossil specimens, supervising the preparation of collections, and computerizing a database of thousands of fossil specimens, many of which were first cataloged more than a century ago.

Meyer earned a Ph.D. in paleontology from the University of California at Berkeley, where he also taught geology and paleontology. After teaching Elderhostel field programs in Oregon, he moved on to a research position at the Florida Museum of Natural History. Strong interests in paleobotany and paleoclimatology led him to the National Park Service. In 1994, he became the sixth National Park Service paleontologist and the first to be permanently assigned to Florissant.

Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument ranks among the world's top fossil plant and insect sites. Until Meyer's arrival, the fossilization at the site was generally attributed to huge volcanic ashfalls that covered an Oligocene lake and its surrounding, subtropical forest. The Oligocene epoch lies between the Eocene and Miocene epochs and is dated generally at 35 million to 27 million years ago. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Paleontology in the National Park Service
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.