Comfort Dogs in the Schools: How Can They Help?

Curriculum Review, May 2018 | Go to article overview

Comfort Dogs in the Schools: How Can They Help?


For the past 30,000 years, dogs have been co-evolving with humans. As a result, they've become adept at reading human social and emotional cues, and are relied upon by humans (and vice versa) for comfort.

While our canine friends have served for decades as working dogs and service dogs helping humans in a variety of ways, one of the newest ways dogs are helping people is through providing general solace, known as comfort dogs. And they're making their way into American classrooms. These pups are not to be confused with "reading dogs" or service dogs you might see at school, reported KQED/MindShift. Instead, they're dogs who are integral members of the school community.

"They don't care if you're good at basketball, or a great reader, or popular," said the head of school at Burgundy Farm Country Day School in Alexandria, Virginia, who brings his dog with him to the school administration building on a leash. "They just want to be loved--equal opportunity."

Having dogs on the school grounds helps set a warm, welcoming tone and they can enhance the school climate, the official said to KQED/Mindshift. "Schools should be fun and exciting, and dogs can be a big part of that," he added.

While dogs have traditionally been kept away from schools whose administrators cite student fears or allergies, a new pilot program in New York City (NYC) is challenging the no-dogs rule. Established in fall 2016 by the city Department of Education, the program pairs select dogs from the North Shore Animal League America with certain schools. The Comfort Dog Pilot Program has grown from seven schools to now serving 42 elementary, middle and high schools.

Some dogs are used as ordinary comfort but others are included in teachers' lesson plans to encourage empathy, cooperation and decision making, noted KQED/Mindshift. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Comfort Dogs in the Schools: How Can They Help?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.