Talking Foreign Policy: Art, Diplomacy, and Accountability

By Scharf, Michael | Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law, Spring 2017 | Go to article overview

Talking Foreign Policy: Art, Diplomacy, and Accountability


Scharf, Michael, Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law


Broadcast quarterly, "Talking Foreign Policy" is a one-hour radio program hosted by Case Western Reserve University School of Law Co-Dean Michael Scharf in which experts discuss the salient foreign policy issues of the day. The broadcast on October 7, 2016, addressed international law and art.

Dean Scharf created "Talking Foreign Policy " to break down complex foreign policy topics that are prominent in day-to-day news cycles, yet difficult to understand. "Talking Foreign Policy" is produced in partnership between Case Western Reserve University School of Law, the only U.S. law school with its own foreign policy talk radio program, and WCPN 90.3 ideastream, Cleveland's National Public Radio affiliate. Archived broadcasts are available for viewing in video format online at law.case.edu/Academics/Academic-Centers/Cox-InternationalLaw-Center/Talking- Foreign-Policy.

This broadcast featured:

* Paul R. Williams, President and co-founder of the Public International Law & Policy Group, who has advised parties to treaty negotiations around the world;

* Mark Ellis, Executive Director of the International Bar Association;

* Bill Schabas, a professor at Middlesex University and a leading expert in human rights law, who has served as a commissioner on two international investigative commissions;

* Shannon French, Director of the Inamori International Center for Ethics and Excellence and an expert on law and morality; and

* Milena Sterio, Associate Dean and Professor of Law at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, who is also one of the permanent editors of the IntLawGrrls blog and an expert in the field of international law.

Talking Foreign Policy: Art, Diplomacy, and Accountability--October 7, 2016 Broadcast

MICHAEL SCHARF: Welcome to Talking Foreign Policy! I'm your host, Michael Scharf, Dean of Case Western Reserve University School of Law. In this broadcast, our expert panelists will be discussing art, diplomacy, and accountability. Joining us remotely from a studio in Washington, D.C., is Dr. Paul Williams, President of the Public International Law & Policy Group, who has been working on issues of accountability for international crimes in Syria. Good to have you on, Paul!

PAUL WILLIAMS: Thanks, Mike. It's my pleasure.

MICHAEL Scharf: Here at the WCPN ideastream studio here in Cleveland, we are joined by Dr. Mark Ellis, Executive Director of the International Bar Association, who is visiting this week from London.

MARK ELLIS: Wonderful to be here.

MICHAEL Scharf: Also with me here in the studio is Professor Bill Schabas of Middlesex University in London, a leading expert in human-rights law, who has served as a commissioner on two international investigative commissions.

BILL Schabas: Thank you for having me.

MICHAEL Scharf: Our panelists also include Dr. Shannon French, with us on the show again. She's the Director of the Inamori International Center for Ethics and Excellence and an expert on law and morality.

SHANNON French: Delighted to be here, Michael.

MICHAEL Scharf: And our final panelist is Professor Milena Sterio, Associate Dean at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. She is a frequent guest on our show and an expert on international law and policy. Thank you all for being with us today!

In our first segment, we will look into one of history's great, great art disputes, the case of the so-called "Elgin Marbles." At the British Museum, which is just a few Tube stops from Bill Schabas's office in London, millions of people every year visit a famous collection of huge marble statues that once covered the walls of the ancient Greek Parthenon. Bill, can you tell us the story of how these statues, considered the most important examples of ancient Greek art and building design, ended up in the British Museum?

BILL SCHABAS: Sure. Well, around 1800 the British ambassador to Turkey, because Athens and Greece [were] still a part of the Ottoman Empire, decided that he was going to start collecting these marbles off the Parthenon. …

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