Youth Voice in Action

By Rauseo-Ricupero, Ronaldo | Nation's Cities Weekly, January 18, 1999 | Go to article overview

Youth Voice in Action


Rauseo-Ricupero, Ronaldo, Nation's Cities Weekly


Boston Teen Inspired by Shared Experiences

Youth delegates who attended last month's Congress of Cities in Kansas City, Mo. will be sharing their impressions of the event with local elected officials via personal accounts to be published in Nation's Cities Weekly during the coming weeks. Following is the first article in the series.

The National League of Cities is an organization to which I owe undying gratitude for the chance to be a youth participant and panelist for the 1998 Congress of Cities. As a member of the Boston Mayor's Youth Council and the Boston School Committee, I was excited about the chance afforded me to advocate for youth on a national level.

To be honest, I came to the conference somewhat on the skeptical side as to the amount of heed that would be paid to the youth delegates. Upon my arrival in Kansas City, however, all of those apprehensions were nullified. I was energized by the realization that NLC is an organization that has made an unprecedented commitment to the concerns of the youth of our nation, and has exhibited a sincere and genuine desire to work with youth in every endeavor to address these issues of concern.

The conference was altogether inspiring for reasons too numerous to elaborate, but I would like to attempt to convey the extraordinary value that I was able to take out of my time at the conference.

The panel discussions were of tremendous benefit. The panelists were knowledgeable about the topics upon which they spoke, and they provided a wide range of solutions to the issues addressed. This really did allow the members of the audience to consider a number of models, or combinations of models, that might be effective in their own cities.

The question and answer sessions were also very helpful, so that the audience could shape the conversation. I learned a great deal more about topics ranging from running effective summer programming, to the success of charter schools, to the creation of youth telephone hotlines.

Having youth on the panels not only made us feel more comfortable in asking questions and wanting to know more, but also provided positive examples of youth advocates, who inspired me to become more active in my own community. I was inspired to discover that I had the chance to learn from the youth who had worked so hard in their cities, and had become real experts in their fields. I was excited that these youth had the chance to teach adults, and work with them, instead of in spite of them.

I was also impressed by the sincere interest generated. I was a speaker on the panel entitled "Local Government Roles in Education: Education Is Everybody's Business." At the end of the session, I was bombarded by adults who wanted to know more about the topic. It was an amazing feeling to think that all the hard work that I had put into programs to advocate for youth in Boston could be replicated on a national scale, and that I would be able to share my work with others, so that other youth would not have to reinvent the wheel of youth advocacy.

I was overwhelmed when youth from other areas of the country approached me, and told me that they are working on the same issues in their cities as I am in Boston. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Youth Voice in Action
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.