Web Site Puts Citigroup Workers on the Same Page

By Power, Carol | American Banker, February 8, 1999 | Go to article overview

Web Site Puts Citigroup Workers on the Same Page


Power, Carol, American Banker


By CAROL POWER

What began as a low-key initiative to get Citigroup's far-flung employees to collaborate has evolved into a robust, cost-saving communications channel for them, the company said.

The Citiweb site began four years ago "as a grass-roots effort" on the banking company's corporate intranet, said Michael Cammon, director of intranet services. Now it gets about 3.5 million hits a day from employees who are executing transactions and exchanging information.

"We're creating new ways to communicate globally, and we're using technology to do that," Mr. Cammon said. Citiweb "is a channel for employees to find information and act on it."

Citiweb sprang from the technology development organization now known as e-Citi, which is populated by many employees with a personal interest in the Internet.

The group's intent with Citiweb was to connect the company's 150,000 employees in 100 countries through Internet billboards, chat rooms, and tools. Now the site, funded by e-Citi, employs 12 people full-time to manage it and develop applications.

Through the years it has evolved from a billboard with static listings to one that is more "user-oriented and transaction-oriented," Mr. Cammon said.

It offers a search engine, employee forms and job postings, newsletters from business units, information on savings plans and benefits, an events calendar, and internal and external news feeds.

The bank saves money by not having to maintain distribution lists, print newsletters, or send information in the mail. …

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