Introduction and Keynote

By Abdus-Salaam, Sheila; Lopez, Elise | Columbia Journal of Gender and Law, Summer 2018 | Go to article overview

Introduction and Keynote


Abdus-Salaam, Sheila, Lopez, Elise, Columbia Journal of Gender and Law


Elise Lopez: My name is Elise Lopez, and I am the president of Empowering Women of Color for the 2016-2017 year. It's so wonderful to see you all here. This is our third annual Empowering Women of Color Conference. Each year, we get better attendance and more engagement. We are joined by our cosponsors: the Columbia Journal of Gender and Law, the African-American Policy Forum, and the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies.

Our theme this year is Double-Consciousness. It's really a theme that strikes at the core of what our group stands for.

It's about being an advocate both for ourselves in the legal and professional world, but also being a mentor to other women of color. It's also about striking that balance between fitting into this generations-old institution of legal practice, but also pushing boundaries and keeping the dialogue going about issues that are relevant to women of color.

We've brought together a wonderful panel of practitioners, scholars, and members of the judiciary. I'm very excited to hear what they have to share with us today about their experiences and the wisdom that they have gained along the way. Opening our conversation is our keynote speaker, the Honorable Sheila Abdus-Salaam, Associate Judge of the New York Court of Appeals.

She is a graduate of Barnard College and also an alumna of our very own Columbia Law School. Upon graduation, she began her legal career as a staff attorney at East Brooklyn Legal Services. Then, she began her work in the judiciary in 1992 in the Civil Court of the City of New York. In 1993, she was elected to the Supreme Court of New York County.

Then, she was appointed an associate justice of the Appellate Division, First Department in March of 2009 by Governor Patterson. In April of 2013, she was nominated by Governor Cuomo to the New York Court of Appeals. She's the first African American woman to serve on the Court of Appeals. We're so very lucky to have her. She has had an illustrious career, and we're excited to hear what she has to say. Please join me in welcoming her.

Judge Sheila Abdus-Salaam: Good morning. Thank you, Elise, for that generous introduction and the warm welcome. This is like a home to me. I've been here so many times since I graduated. As I walked in the door this morning, one of the students here reminded me of a student I knew at Barnard who became the dean of students at Columbia Law School. Now, she's the dean of students at Harvard Law School. I've been here quite a bit over the years. I'm very happy to be here this morning. This theme, Double-Consciousness: Women of Color as Advocates for Ourselves and Others is one that, of course, touches me very personally.

You've heard a little bit about me, but I thought I would share some of my experiences and my thoughts about the profession as I've embarked on my legal career and journey, what I call lifting as I climb and giving back. Mine has been a remarkable climb, as you've heard, all the way from a poor, working-class neighborhood in southeast Washington, D.C. to the Court of Appeals in Albany.

Back in the 1950s and 60s when I was attending still-segregated public schools more than a decade after the United States Supreme Court's landmark Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1) decision, some might have thought my ascension to such lofty heights was impossible. Even I, sometimes, have found it hard to believe my improbable good fortune in becoming the first African American woman to serve on our state's highest court in its 169-year history.

There is that double-consciousness. Why didn't I think I would get there? I have to say my mother thought nothing was impossible. She would not have been surprised that I was there. Unfortunately, she did not live to see me get there, although she did see me get on the bench. My family was one of those who could have benefited from free or low-cost legal services. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Introduction and Keynote
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.