Law Threatens Food Safety

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 5, 2018 | Go to article overview

Law Threatens Food Safety


Law threatens food safety

Every state's right to control the agricultural products sold in their state is being threatened. It means our food safety is at huge risk.

Rep. Steve King from Iowa wants to add his amendment called the "Protect Interstate Commerce Act" (HR 4879) to this year's Farm Bill. If added, the laws that ban harmful or toxic food items from entering our grocery stores could be reversed. Soon, states could be forced to sell these products just because some other state allows their sale. It's not fair, and every state should be able to establish its own rules and regulations in order to protect its consumers and citizens.

I don't want to have to do research before going to the grocery store; I want to trust that my state government will not let dangerous products on grocery store shelves.

There's only a small window of time to prevent King's amendment from being added to the final Farm Bill, so please contact your representatives and senators today and ask them to vote against the amendment. Our food safety matters.

Chak Dantuluri

Naperville

Racism still a force in America

Many individuals, including some in the media, put up the argument that racism is no longer a factor in our society. After all, didn't we elect an African American as president twice?

Two articles on separate incidents appear to say racism is still rampant in our society. These articles appeared within a recent five-day period.

One article outlined police being called on a group of African American golfers because they were "playing too slowly." According to the report, the black golfers were all experienced and had played throughout the country. Would the golfers have been treated this way if they were Caucasian?

The other article focused on "retail racism" in the incident where a Starbucks called police on two black men sitting in the restaurant and waiting for a third person to appear. The issue of retail racism relates to how blacks are perceived in stores and shops when dressed casually. Blacks may be followed in high-end stores if dressed casually.

One may read these examples and feel that this is not representative of America. I have personally heard the pastor of a black church in Elgin tell of being followed while shopping because he was black and casually dressed.

Unfortunately, we must be open to the fact that systemic racism is in full bloom in 21st century America. It has existed in our country for 500 years. We must be open to its existence and the need to eliminate it from our society. I encourage those reading this to be active in eliminating racism.

Royce M. Blackwell

Elgin

God is present

In answer to Diana Carter's last question in her letter printed on April 30, yes, I believe God is present with love, compassion, and understanding when a woman chooses to end the life of her unborn child.

He is there weeping, trying to get her to trust him to help her through this unplanned pregnancy.

He is there when she goes ahead with her decision to abort her baby whose heart is beating, who already has his or her own fingerprints, still weeping as he takes this little life to be with him forever in heaven.

And yes, he's still there seeking to comfort her, to reassure her of his love, and should she repent and receive Jesus as her Savior and Lord, to forgive her, to embrace her as his child, and one day to introduce her to her precious baby in heaven.

Patricia Bertrand

Wood Dale

End sexual violence in culture of respect

With the month of April at an end, we'd like to thank the many communities who participated in the 2018 Sexual Assault Awareness campaign, raising public awareness and educating communities. …

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