Preventing TERRORISM; HERE'S HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE ACCEPTED ON TO NATIONAL TERRORISM PREVENTION PROGRAMMES

The Journal (Newcastle, England), May 10, 2018 | Go to article overview

Preventing TERRORISM; HERE'S HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE ACCEPTED ON TO NATIONAL TERRORISM PREVENTION PROGRAMMES


Byline: ALICE CACHIA

NEARLY 17 people a day were referred to a national terrorism prevention scheme in 2016/17 - though only a fraction were actually accepted.

Data from the Ministry of Defence shows that some 6,093 people across England and Wales were referred to the Prevent programme - a government scheme that safeguards people from becoming terrorists or supporting terrorism.

The Prevent aims to at risk of into All referrals are first screened to make sure they have not been made maliciously and that there is a specific vulnerability around radicalisation.

After being discussed at a panel, just 332 people were deemed suitable for the scheme - and nearly 40 per cent of those were at risk of practising right wing extremism.

In fact, the number of people receiving support for right wing extremism has more than doubled in the past five years.

In 2013/14, just 46 people were accepted on the scheme because of the threat of this kind of terrorism.

programme rehabilitate those being drawn terrorism By 2015/16 the figure had climbed to 98 people, before reaching 124 people in 2016/17 - the highest number on record.

While the number of people receiving support for right wing extremism has risen, those deemed at risk of practising Islamic terrorism is starting to decline.

In 2016/17 some 184 people were supported on the scheme for this reason - down from 264 people the previous year.

Meanwhile, some 24 individuals received support in 2016/17 because of concerns over other types of terrorism. …

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