Seattle's Trade Alliance: Going beyond Regional Boundaries

By Shimek, Daila; O'Brien, Kevin et al. | Nation's Cities Weekly, February 1, 1999 | Go to article overview

Seattle's Trade Alliance: Going beyond Regional Boundaries


Shimek, Daila, O'Brien, Kevin, Petrone, Susan, Nation's Cities Weekly


Leaders of the nation's cities are increasingly involved in collaborations aimed at ensuring the competitiveness of their regional economy for the benefit of the area's residents. This article about the Greater Seattle initiatives begins a Weekly series on these efforts at "regional economic governance."

These articles build on NLC's long-standing focus on regional economies and inter-local collaboration. Among the products of that focus are:

* NLC publications, including the 1996 survey of 476 cities American Cities in the Global Economy, have highlighted the local challenges and opportunities presented by the international economy.

* In 1996 and again in 1998, NLC conducted successful national conferences on "Achieving World Class Local Economies."

* The 1993 Futures Report, Global Dollars, Local Sense, presented the case for city officials to develop more fully their cities' roles in the global context.

* The path-breaking report, "All in it Together" documented that the economic fates and fortunes of cities and suburbs are tied together in their "local economic regions."

This new series will include articles that spotlight economic governance efforts in the regions of Seattle, Atlanta, Dallas/Fort Worth, Pittsburgh, and the San Antonio/Austin corridor.

--Bill Barnes

Seattle's location, at the northeastern tip of the Pacific is a prime spot for international business and trade. In order to capitalize on the region's geographic advantages, the Trade Development Alliance of Greater Seattle was created in 1991.

Its primary goals are to promote the Greater Seattle area in domestic and international markets; raise awareness of the area's exports, marine and aviation facilities; and to encourage tourism and investment in the region.

The Trade Development Alliance is a collaboration of the Port of Seattle, Metropolitan King County Government, Snohomish County Government, City of Seattle, City of Everett, Greater Seattle Chamber of Commerce and union leadership, all of which represent a population of approximately three million people.

Representatives from the seven partners make up a twenty-member executive board that oversees six full-time staff members. The Trade Alliance also has a sixty-member Advisory Committee and a membership of over 190 companies. Because the Trade Alliance's aim is to supplement, not supplant, other organizations, all business members who wish to join the Trade Alliance must be a member of a chamber of commerce. Funding primarily comes from partnership support and is supplemented by membership fees.

The Trade Alliance is credited with beginning to tie together a patchwork of fragmented local international economic development initiatives with a regionwide effort that strives for a consensus between business, government and labor. The "Foundation for the Future" study facilitated by the Trade Alliance, for example, has been used by three counties--King, Snohomish and Pierce--to develop their own economic development action plans that dovetail with a regional vision. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Seattle's Trade Alliance: Going beyond Regional Boundaries
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.