Where Black Votes Mean More Than Black Well-Being

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 16, 2018 | Go to article overview

Where Black Votes Mean More Than Black Well-Being


In the aftermath of the Kanye West dust-up, my heart goes out to the white people who control the Democratic Party. My pity stems from the hip-hop megastar's November announcement to his packed concert audience that he did not vote in the presidential election, but if he had, he would have voted for Donald Trump. Then, on April 21, West took to his Twitter account, which has 28 million followers, to announce: "I love the way Candace Owens thinks." Owens is Turning Point USA's director of urban engagement and has said that former President Barack Obama caused "damage" to race relations in the United States during his two terms in office.

West's support for Trump, along with his criticism of the "plantation" mentality of the Democratic Party, has been met with vicious backlash from the left. In one song, West raps, "See, that's the problem with this damn nation. All blacks gotta be Democrats. Man, we ain't made it off the plantation."

Rep. Maxine Waters said West "talks out of turn" and advised, "He should think twice about politics -- and maybe not have so much to say."

The bottom-line sin that West has committed is questioning the hegemony of the Democratic Party among black Americans. Fortunately, police are investigating the ensuing threats against West's life.

Kanye West is not saying anything different from what Dr. Thomas Sowell, Larry Elder, Jason Riley, other black libertarians/conservatives and I have been saying for decades. In fact, West has tweeted quotations from Sowell, such as "Socialism in general has a record of failure so blatant that only an intellectual could ignore or evade it" and "The most basic question is not what is best but who shall decide what is best." Tweeting those quotations represents the highest order of blasphemy in the eyes of leftists.

The big difference between black libertarians/conservatives and West is that he has 28 million Twitter followers and a huge audience of listeners, whereas few blacks have even heard of libertarian/conservative blacks outside of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. …

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