Authorship Trend and Collaborative Research in Lung Cancer: A Time Series Analysis Study

By Sindagi, Shridevi Prakash; Anandhalli, Gavisiddappa Bhalappa | Library Philosophy and Practice, February 2018 | Go to article overview

Authorship Trend and Collaborative Research in Lung Cancer: A Time Series Analysis Study


Sindagi, Shridevi Prakash, Anandhalli, Gavisiddappa Bhalappa, Library Philosophy and Practice


Introduction:

Scientometrics is the study of measuring and analyzing of science publication. Scientometric is often called as bibliometric. It has been originated from Russia. The scientific paper or text not only reveals the world building strategy of its authors, but also the nature and force of the building blocks derived from the domain of science from which it draws and to which it contributes (Gupta and Kumar, 2001). Bibliometrics offer a set of measures for studying the structure and process of scholarly communication (Gupta, and Kumar, 2001). One of its main indicators is the number of published articles or science production in specific field of science. The cancer is one of the most emerging area in the field of medical sciences and there is dearth need of research. Hence, an attempt has been made to carry out the present research.

In the last few decades the field of Library and Information Science (LIS) has developed several quantitative methods for analysis. As Library and Information Science is a widely interdisciplinary field (Nisonger & Davis, 2005), academics from various disciplines (including LIS) have played a vital role development of its methods. Often scientists with different background from Library and Information Science, like Tibor Braun (Chemistry) or Vasily Nalimov (Philosophy), have contributed important concepts. The suffix 'metrics' is "derived either from the Latin or Greek word "metricus" or "metrikos" respectively, means measurement" (Sengupta, 1992). To date Several different metric fields that deal with the development and Application of measurement in the area of Information Science has emerged, such as Librametirics, Bibliometrics, Scientometrics, Informetrics, and more recently Webometrics and Altmetrics. However, all these fields are closely related, especially Bibliometrics, Informetrics and Scientometrics, and shows significant overlap.

Nowadays in all area of research we are observing collaborative research, "Collaborative research", is any research in which two or more researchers work together toward a common target, and in which all of the researchers make an important, equal contribution to the project. Not counted as researchers are people who provide assistance but do not make equal contribution; for example, someone who is hired to transcribe interviews but makes no other contribution to the research is not considered a part of the collaborative team. The focus is on aspects of collaborative research that are unregulated. Here in this paper an attempt is made to observe collaborative research in the area of Lung Cancer.

Lung Cancer:

The term lung cancer is used for tumors arising from the respiratory epithelium (bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli).

A review of the history of lung cancer shows that about a century and a half ago, lung cancer was an extremely rare disease. Lung cancer has been known in industrial workers from the late 19th century. It came into prominence as a public health problem in the Western world in 1930s--at first in men, and later (in 1960s) among women. The causes of increase in lung cancer incidence were thought to have included increased air pollution, cigarette smoking, asphalting of roads, increase in automobile traffic, exposure to gas in World War I, the influenza pandemic of 1918 and working with benzene or gasoline. Duration of the disease, from diagnosis until death, was usually from half a year to 2 years and in practically all cases, there had been a long history of chronic bronchitis. According to WHO reports, between 1960 and 1980, the death rate due to lung cancer increased by 76% in men and by 135% in women.

The American Lung Association is committed to funding lung cancer research. As part of our Awards and Grants Program over 20% of funds go towards research on the prevention and treatment of lung cancer. The primary goal of this lung cancer research program is simple: To improve and save lives. …

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