How Kids Can Avoid Sports Injuries

Cape Times (South Africa), May 22, 2018 | Go to article overview

How Kids Can Avoid Sports Injuries


Few parents enrol their children in organised sports with the expectation that they will get injured. Yet children often do get hurt and sometimes those injuries can sideline young athletes for months, or an entire season, and may sour them on participating in the future.

The effects of sports injuries may even linger into adulthood.

"Injuries are often considered an inevitable part of sports," according to Dr Terry A Adirim, a sports medicine expert who is now a health affairs specialist for the US Department of Defence, and Dr Tina L Cheng, director of paediatrics at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

"However, like other injuries, sports injuries are potentially preventable."

Reducing the risk of injury, they wrote, in the journal Sports Medicine, requires taking into account the physical and physiological differences between children and adults, differences that can leave youngsters more vulnerable to injury. Children have a larger surface area and bigger heads relative to their body size; their growing cartilage is more susceptible to stresses; and most lack "the complex motor skills needed for certain sports until after puberty".

In a guide to safety for young athletes, the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons points out that "children's bones, muscles, tendons and ligaments are still growing," which makes them more susceptible to injury.

Growth plates, the cartilage at the end of long bones where bone growth occurs, are especially susceptible to injury that could disrupt normal growth.

"A twisted ankle that might result in a sprain in an adult, could result in a more serious growth plate fracture in a young athlete," the organisation emphasised.

"Also, children lack an adult's level of co-ordination, strength and stamina.

Many parents want their children to reap the benefits of sports participation. In addition to socialising with their peers and enhancing self-esteem, sports participation fosters a child's overall health and bone density and reduces the risk of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression, risk-taking behaviour and teen pregnancy, noted Dr Cynthia Bella, paediatric orthopaedist at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine and co-author of an editorial on youth sports injury prevention in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Therefore, the goal should be to take whatever measures one can to avoid athletic injuries, or at least minimise their severity, and keep kids in the game.

"First and foremost that means parents and coaches must create an atmosphere of healthy competition with an emphasis on co-operation, self-confidence and good clean fun rather than just winning.

"Children need to learn how to deal with defeat as well as victory. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

How Kids Can Avoid Sports Injuries
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.