Education News

Nursing and Health Care Perspectives, November 1998 | Go to article overview

Education News


WHAT IS NEW at your school of nursing? Please contact Nursing and Health Care Perspectives c/o Leslie Block, Publications Manager, National League for Nursing, 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006; fax 212/812-0393; lblock@nln.org.

New Biotherapy Nursing Curriculum In the past eight years, the number of biologic agents being used to treat cancer patients has increased dramatically, and others are in development. They have had a major impact on the nurse's role in the treatment of cancer. Ninety percent of nurses surveyed at the Oncology Nursing Society Congress in May expressed a need to increase their knowledge and understanding of these agents in the following areas: mode of action in the body, administration of biotherapy products versus chemotherapy drugs, and communicating to patients what biotherapy treatments do.

During the Congress, a national advisory board of oncology nurse experts gathered to develop a program to bridge the education gap surrounding new cancer therapies. The Biotherapy Nursing Curriculum consists of a series of teaching modules in slide format designed to give nurses in oncology and general practice areas an understanding of biotherapies as well as guidelines for safe, competent care. (For more information or to order a copy, call 800/944-0604.)

The activities of the Biotherapy Nursing Curriculum Advisory Board are funded through an unrestricted educational grant from the Chiron Corp., which has supported educational programs in immunotherapy and biologics for several years. Paula Trahan Rieger, MSN, ANP, CS, OCN, FAAN, of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, was chair of the advisory board.

UCLA Extension Six required courses--on financial management, legal concepts, organization of health care services, emerging issues, and managerial methods including strategic planning, decision making, and conflict resolution--form the core of the UCLA Extension Certificated Program in the Management and Administration of Health Care Organizations. This program, designed for clinicians who are moving toward greater managerial and administrative responsibility, features an up-to-date, problem-oriented curriculum. (To request a brochure, call 310/825-7257.)

College of Mount St. Joseph With the demand for nurse paralegals on the rise, the College of Mount St. Joseph in Cincinnati, OH, is offering a new major, Paralegal Studies for Nurses, one of the few such programs approved by the American Bar Association. Offered through the College's Department of Behavioral Sciences, the program is open to RNs with 2,000 hours of clinical nursing experience. Various options are designed for nurses with and without BSN degrees. Classes can be scheduled during evenings and weekends.

University of Pennsylvania African-American women are 69 percent more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than white women. With a grant from the Aetna Foundation, the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing developed a cardiovascular fitness program designed specifically for African-American women and girls. The program is offered free of charge weekly at a community-based, primary health care practice site, part of the Penn Nursing Network, a cooperative effort between the School of Nursing, the Philadelphia Departments of Recreation and Health, and neighborhood residents. …

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