Korean Summit Back on Summit: Trump Anticipates Multiple Meetings before North Drops Nukes

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 2, 2018 | Go to article overview

Korean Summit Back on Summit: Trump Anticipates Multiple Meetings before North Drops Nukes


Byline: David Nakamura The Washington Post

WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump on Friday capped a week of whipsaw talks by reinstating a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un just days after he had abruptly canceled it, but he also sought to lower expectations over the potential for a quick denuclearization deal.

Trump made the announcement in impromptu remarks outside the South Portico after meeting for more than 90 minutes with a top Kim aide in the Oval Office. Kim Yong Chol, the vice chairman of North Korea's Central Committee, delivered a personal letter from the young dictator, a gesture viewed as an effort to ease tensions after Trump abruptly called things off last week amid escalating threats from Pyongyang.

But even as the president hailed the restart of his high-stakes diplomatic endeavor, he acknowledged that a full breakthrough on long-stymied U.S. efforts to eliminate the North's nuclear weapons program would be unlikely at the summit, set for June 12 in Singapore.

"I never said it goes in one meeting," Trump told reporters, after walking Kim Yong Chol to a black SUV outside the South Portico and taking pictures with him and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. "I think it's going to be a process. But the relationships are building, and that's a very positive thing."

Trump characterized the summit -- the first between a sitting U.S. president and a North Korean leader -- as "a beginning" and a "getting to know you meeting-plus" in his effort to apply his unorthodox brand of personal diplomacy to a challenge that has vexed his predecessors.

"You're talking about years of hostility; years of problems; years of, really, hatred between so many different nations," Trump said. "But I think you're going to have a very positive result in the end. Not from one meeting."

The president's remarks suggested that his administration is coming to terms with the widely held view among former U.S. officials that Kim Jong Un has no intention of quickly relinquishing an arsenal his family has spent decades assembling.

The near-collapse of the summit, after a hostile response from Pyongyang to suggestions from Trump aides that the United States would demand a rapid denuclearization process, offered new evidence that any path to a deal is likely to be marked by fits and starts and threatened by potential land mines.

Past U.S. administrations have accused North Korea of violating agreements with additional nuclear and ballistic missile tests. Asked Friday if he was confident that the North Korean regime was committed to denuclearization, the president said: "I think they want to do that. I know they want to do that."

But Trump also suggested additional summit meetings with Kim could be necessary.

"I told them, 'I think that you're going to have, probably, others,'" Trump said. "'Hey, wouldn't it be wonderful if we walked out and everything was settled all of a sudden from sitting down for a couple of hours?' No, I don't see that happening. But I see over a period of time."

Experts said Trump's shifting rhetoric was necessary to keep the summit on track by reducing the gap in expectations between Washington and Pyongyang, which has signaled it would only negotiate over a slower, step-by-step process to curb its weapons programs in exchange for reciprocal benefits from the United States and other countries.

After Trump called off the summit in a letter to Kim last week, negotiating teams from the two sides have met in the Korean Demilitarized Zone and in Singapore to try to forge agreement over the summit's agenda and logistics.

Pompeo met with Kim Yong Chul for two hours in New York on Thursday, a prelude to the White House meeting Friday.

"We've seen communications from both sides over the last few weeks that reduce the gap," said Joseph Yun, who served as the State Department's special representative for North Korea policy until stepping down earlier this year. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Korean Summit Back on Summit: Trump Anticipates Multiple Meetings before North Drops Nukes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.