Passive Job Seekers Need to Act Fast; Seven in 10 Candidates Are Classed as 'Passive', Waiting for Recruiters to Approach Them Rather Than Responding to Job Ads. However, New Data Protection Regulations Might See the Job Offers Drying Up. So How Should You Respond? by Niki Chesworth

The Evening Standard (London, England), June 12, 2018 | Go to article overview

Passive Job Seekers Need to Act Fast; Seven in 10 Candidates Are Classed as 'Passive', Waiting for Recruiters to Approach Them Rather Than Responding to Job Ads. However, New Data Protection Regulations Might See the Job Offers Drying Up. So How Should You Respond? by Niki Chesworth


YOUR inbox has probably been full of them: emails from organisations you might never have heard of asking for your consent to keep your details. But now the deadline for the new General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) has passed you have probably seen a lot less of this junk coming in than before.

While most of us are relieved to deal with less spam, some of the emails you are no longer getting could be your next big break a new job with better prospects and a much larger pay packet.

It is quite flattering to be approached by a potential employer, even if you aren't really looking around for another role, but if you did not tick the box or reply to the email and consent to having your details stored, the approaches from recruiters have probably already dried up.

This is because recruiters must now ensure that a "candidate's personal data was obtained in a context where that candidate has provided reasonable evidence of expecting to be contacted". So if it was a while since you were on the jobs market, this "reasonable evidence" might not apply to you.

Simply having a LinkedIn profile is not enough to pass the "legitimate interest" although if you have indicated that you are looking for a role, you could be open to offers.

So what does this mean for your ability to find a new job? Well, if you were contacted by recruiters prior to last month's deadline and gave your opt-in consent to having your details stored, you will probably still be on their radar when it comes to candidates.

If you did not, you are probably missing out on one of the ways that organisations now use to source talent.

Back in the day, it was called headhunting and reserved for highearning, high-flyers. Today, "passive candidates" are the norm and details of potential candidates at all levels, particularly those with hard-to-fill skills sets, are added to databases by recruiters desperate to fill roles.

According to analysis of official statistics by recruiters Robert Half, one in 20 roles is still not filled after six months so a lack of candidates is a major issue for organisations.

So if you are asked to add your information to a database (sourced candidates should be told that their information is being processed for recruitment purposes within 30 days), perhaps you should consent.

In fact, social media pundits say you should go one step further and counter the new GDPR regulations by boosting your online presence so you are not invisible to potential employers. …

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Passive Job Seekers Need to Act Fast; Seven in 10 Candidates Are Classed as 'Passive', Waiting for Recruiters to Approach Them Rather Than Responding to Job Ads. However, New Data Protection Regulations Might See the Job Offers Drying Up. So How Should You Respond? by Niki Chesworth
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