1 in 4 Trusts Deny Women Reconstructive Surgery after Breast Cancer

Daily Mail (London), June 18, 2018 | Go to article overview

1 in 4 Trusts Deny Women Reconstructive Surgery after Breast Cancer


Byline: Sophie Borland Health Editor

ONE in four health trusts are denying women life-changing operations after breast cancer, an investigation has found.

They are imposing tough restrictions on the availability of breast reconstruction surgery, which is meant to be offered to all patients on the NHS following a mastectomy.

Up to 3,500 women in England undergo breast reconstruction each year and experts say it is vital for restoring their confidence and femininity. But the investigation found that 23 per cent of Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) have introduced formal guidelines to ration its availability. Some CCGs have imposed a limit on the number of reconstruction operations a woman can have even though she may need several before it is absolutely right.

Normally the surgery costs about PS4,000 although it is considerably higher if women need more than one operation. Other CCGs tell women they must decide on whether they want surgery within a set time frame after the initial cancer treatment.

This can be up to one year and if women want to wait longer, their reconstruction surgery won't be funded.

Other CCGs refuse to pay for 'balancing' surgery on the unaffected breast to ensure it is the same size.

'It is totally unacceptable that any patient is being denied the reconstructive surgery they need or rushed into potentially life-changing decisions, at such a difficult time,' said Baroness Delyth Morgan, chief executive of the charity Breast Cancer Now, which used Freedom of Information requests to uncover the figures.

'Reconstructive surgery has profound benefits, helping give many their confidence and their lives back after breast cancer. These arbitrary restrictions in some areas of the country represent a backward step in treatment and are absolutely not in the best interests of patients.

'The reasons for these restrictions remain unclear, but with the NHS facing unprecedented pressures, their introduction despite clear clinical advice begs the question whether they are being driven by a desire to reduce costs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

1 in 4 Trusts Deny Women Reconstructive Surgery after Breast Cancer
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.