Jeanne and the Perfect Guy

By Stuart, Jan | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), May 11, 1999 | Go to article overview

Jeanne and the Perfect Guy


Stuart, Jan, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


* Written and directed by Olivier Ducastel and Jacques Martineau * Composed by Philippe Miller * Starring Virginie Ledoyen, Valerie Bonneton, Mathieu Demy, and Jacques Bonnaffe * Strand Releasing

The reception desk where Jeanne answers phones for Jet Tour sits in plain view of a revolving door that spits visitors in and out of her Paris office building. It's a metaphor, none too subtle, for the constant parade of men who fail into this alluring young woman's bed and just as quickly make their exit.

The heroine at the nexus of the French Jeanne and the Perfect Guy is neither a harridan nor a loser. As played by the daisy-flesh Virginie Ledoyen, Jeanne is a Madonna-age gal who digs sex and won't go for second best, baby. After marking time with a messenger boy and her hopelessly bourgeois boss, she finds the best guy on a Metro train. Zing go the strings of her heart, zip go the teeth on her skirt. And voile, the lover man is HIV-positive!

When Madonna-esque women have something to say, what do they do? They sing, of course. Damn it if Jeanne and the Perfect Guy isn't a musical, an Umbrellas of Cherbourg for the mid-plague years. The Canadian film musical Zero Patience and the Broadway hit Rent may have scoped out this territory, and the recent seriocomedy Playing by Heart added more fodder for hetero couples learning the HIV blues, but Jeanne and the Perfect Guy is a welcome wrinkle on the AIDS soaper. Like its predecessors, Jeanne improbably but successfully devises a utopia where fairy-tale romance and hard reality coexist as comfortably as gay and straight. …

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