Library Signage: Creating Aesthetics with Canva

By Scardina, Ciro | Teacher Librarian, June 2018 | Go to article overview

Library Signage: Creating Aesthetics with Canva


Scardina, Ciro, Teacher Librarian


Teaching is a performing art. I am secure in this assertion. An artist is comfortable in his own skin and uses his craft to enlighten, amuse, and inspire. An artist knows how to use the best parts of himself to reach and impact his audience. I am a teacher and a librarian and an artist. It is the artist in me that my students identify with most because that is my authentic self.

Educators are always on the lookout for just the right method to entice students-that magic elixir that intrinsically arouses the desire to learn. When we find one, we add it to our toolkit. As unique as a wrench is to its purpose, the method is individual to the student it hooks. After some pondering, I realized that my spirit--that which brings me joy--is the magic elixir. And that joy comes from art.

In this article, I discuss my attempts to effect beauty in the learning environment of children through good design principles utilizing Canva as a platform to create signage, branding, and infographies. I illustrate the importance of aesthetics through a study of environmental graphic design (EGD) in changing the perceptions of a community in Pittsburgh through cultural and social connectivity and link the work in Pittsburgh to my work at a library in New York.

AESTHETICS

Art is my point of departure, that which I use to connect with my students. Most of the time it is through music and dance that this connection happens, but I have had great success in employing the philosophy of aesthetics into my practice as a teacher librarian. Aesthetics, which concerns itself with the nature of art, beauty, and taste, is severely lacking in education today, and ignoring aesthetics has aided, in my opinion, the slow ruination of education.

The root of the word aesthetic is the Greek aisthetike, which means perception through the senses. As humans, we interact with the world through our senses, which form our perceptions. What is the grist for students' sensory mills? Education is not just about the nuts and bolts of learning. School should be an experience, and as such it should speak to the whole child, not just the parts that can be quantified in data. If our schools do not reflect and immerse students in the arts and aesthetics, then we have given up our responsibility of creating a better world for students.

MY RESEARCH

In its heyday, West Brighton, a community on Staten Island, New York, was the place to be, but in recent years its reputation has changed, and people's perceptions of it, both residents and outsiders, are negative. It is a neighborhood with a segregated urban landscape. "Urban segregation occurs when a city's diversities create perceived barriers around concentrated clusters of social groups" (Schwanbeck, 2013).

In his article "Environmental Graphic Design: Changing the Perceptions of Divided Communities through Cultural and Social Connectivity," Schwanbeck (2013) explores the value of EGD in promoting and improving the perceptions of the East Liberty neighborhood of Pittsburgh, PA. West Brighton shares many of the same issues that beleaguered East Liberty, and I've used principles of EGD in my school community without even knowing it.

The question in East Liberty was basic: How can EGD and its power to communicate information make a difference in a segregated city? Designers learned about the community's history and cultural makeup, as well as the perceptions of it. "The 5E's model was created to illustrate what the experience of visiting East Liberty was like. The 5E's stand for, Entice, Enter, Engage, Exit, and Extend.... The goal of the 5E's model is to plot out the existing experience of visiting East Liberty and compare that to the change that elements from this study might bring to it" (Schwanbeck, 2013).

To entice current residents to rediscover their neighborhood and for visitors to learn more about it, a website and online application were designed to share information about the neighborhood. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Library Signage: Creating Aesthetics with Canva
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.