A Gender-Linked Exploratory Factor Analysis of Antisocial Behavior in Young Adolescents

By Marcus, Robert F. | Adolescence, Spring 1999 | Go to article overview

A Gender-Linked Exploratory Factor Analysis of Antisocial Behavior in Young Adolescents


Marcus, Robert F., Adolescence


There has been little acceptance of a taxonomy of antisocial behavior for adolescents despite many years of study (Moffitt, 1993). Reasons for this lack

of an accepted taxonomic approach include: (1) antisocial behaviors range from relatively mild, such as cutting classes, to severe, such as assault with a deadly weapon, yet they are often considered together; (2) some studies have focused on the acts themselves, separately classifying types of theft and drug/alcohol use, while others have focused on the person, such as violent types and runaways; and (3) diverse methods have used self-report versus the ratings of others (e.g., parents), behaviors of incarcerated delinquents as compared with antisocial behaviors in the general population, lists of behaviors with few versus many items, and samples that combine rather than separate males and females.

Research that has attempted to classify adolescent antisocial behavior in terms of logical similarity, as well as research that has focused on the individual's behavior patterns, can be used to illustrate the problems with both approaches. For example, Pfefferbaum and Wood (1994) examined three kinds of delinquency in a sample of 296 college students: interpersonal delinquency, which included serious fights and using a weapon; property delinquency, which included theft, such as stealing a car; and substance delinquency, which included drinking alcohol and using drugs. These three categories were correlated with measures of thrill-seeking, self-control, socialization, and school success. Correlations between the three classes of delinquent behaviors were found to be low to moderate: substance delinquency and property delinquency, .256; substance delinquency and interpersonal delinquency, .279; property delinquency and interpersonal delinquency, .640. Further, multiple regression analysis, with the three forms of delinquency as dependent variables, showed only one consistent predictor; namely, males showed higher scores. Otherwise, the predictors varied for each of the dependent variables.

Pfefferbaum and Wood's (1994) finding of low to moderate correlations between logically grouped classes of delinquent behavior, and differing motivations for each, provided two reasons to separate the forms of delinquency when investigating social and personality correlates. However, there may have been problems with their classification system. It was possible that stealing and drug sales shared a functional relationship, or that drug use and drug sales were unrelated because they did not share the same motivational basis. Thus, uncovering related clusters of antisocial behaviors would set the stage for an empirically based examination of personality and social correlates.

A contrasting approach has viewed antisocial behavior as unidimensional. In a study by Simons, Robertson, and Downs (1989), scores for widely varying behaviors, such as cutting classes, assault with a deadly weapon, and drug sales, were combined and then correlated with social and personality variables. If antisocial behavior is truly a unidimensional construct, then combining these behaviors was warranted, whereas if it is multidimensional, then such combination may have masked important differential associations with social and personality dimensions.

Research has also attempted to focus primarily on the individual and secondarily on the nature of the behavior itself. Moffitt (1993), taking a developmental perspective, identified two kinds of antisocial individuals: life-course-persistent offenders and adolescence-limited offenders. Life-course-persistent offenders begin engaging in antisocial acts before adolescence. In sharp contrast, adolescence-limited offenders start during adolescence and generally engage in vandalism, substance abuse, status offenses (e.g., running away from home), and theft. While the life-course-persistent offenders also engage in such behaviors, they are prone to commit more serious victim-oriented offenses. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Gender-Linked Exploratory Factor Analysis of Antisocial Behavior in Young Adolescents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.