Britain's Industrial Heritage Seeks World Status

By Aldous, Tony | History Today, May 1999 | Go to article overview

Britain's Industrial Heritage Seeks World Status


Aldous, Tony, History Today


When Mrs Thatcher took Britain out of UNESCO in 1985, the UK's list of World Heritage Sites, which UNESCO administers was frozen. A couple of months after Labour's election victory, Britain rejoined UNESCO and Chris Smith's Department for Culture, Media and Sport began dusting down its list of possible further British sites. Greenwich and Edinburgh quickly joined the dub; then last summer the DCMS published a `tentative list' of possible further nominations.

World Heritage Sites exist to protect and promote understanding of places that are of `outstanding universal value' for their cultural and/or natural qualities. Britain's pre-1985 sites included such cultural icons as Stonehenge, the Tower of London and Ironbridge Gorge. The new list's biggest grouping is called simply `Industrialisation', implying that historically Britain's most important gift to the world has not been football or television but the Industrial Revolution.

The coverage is wide: tin mining in Cornwall, coal and iron in Wales, whisky distilling in Scotland and cotton mills in Manchester and New Lanark. It includes such setpieces as the Forth Rail Bridge, a canal aqueduct in Wales and Brunel's entire London to Bristol railway. But the list is tentative; UNESCO and its advisers are choosy, and the DCMS will nominate only those sites with a really well-supported case. A ninth potential site, the Derwent Valley in Derbyshire, looks a powerful contender.

The Valley's case benefits from a detailed report drawn up by the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England in association with English Heritage, which came just three months after Chris Smith's Tentative List. The proposed site comprises a narrow 17 mile stretch of the lower Derwent Valley including the historic textile areas of Cromford, Belper, Milford, Darley Abbey and Derby - each of huge significance not only in the history of textiles but of the whole factory system and industrialisation.

Cromford was where Arkwright harnessed first a series of streams and then the Derwent itself to power a range of textile machinery, and where he built mill-workers' housing to accommodate a newly concentrated labour force. At Belper and Milford, the Strutt family developed water-power, fire resistant industrial buildings, social housing and farms to feed their workforce. At Darley Abbey, on the outskirts of Derby, the Evans family developed an impressive complex of mills, pioneered advances in fireproof construction and built model housing and community facilities for their workers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Britain's Industrial Heritage Seeks World Status
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.