Experience of Domestic Violence and Psychological Morbidity in Spouses of Alcohol-Dependent Males

By Indu, Pankajakshan; Jinu, Chandran et al. | Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine, July-August 2018 | Go to article overview

Experience of Domestic Violence and Psychological Morbidity in Spouses of Alcohol-Dependent Males


Indu, Pankajakshan, Jinu, Chandran, Pallikkal, Noorudheen, Sampathkumar, Ramya, Joy, Jomon, Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine


Byline: Pankajakshan. Indu, Chandran. Jinu, Noorudheen. Pallikkal, Ramya. Sampathkumar, Jomon. Joy

Background: Prevalence of both domestic violence (DV) and alcohol use is reported to be high in Kerala. The prevalence of DV and psychological morbidity in spouses of alcohol-dependent males has not been studied objectively. Methods: This cross-sectional study was undertaken to study the occurrence of DV and psychological morbidity-major depressive disorder (MDD), anxiety disorders, and adjustment disorders-in spouses of alcohol-dependent males attending the de-addiction center of a tertiary care hospital in South India. Sixty consecutive cases, aged 18-55 years, were recruited after getting informed consent. They were assessed using Domestic Violence Questionnaire (DVQ), Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Schedule, and a questionnaire to assess adjustment disorder. The association of DV with psychological morbidities was also studied. Results: DV was reported by 41 (68.3%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 55.0-79.7) cases. At least one psychiatric morbidity was observed in 51 (85.0%, 95% CI = 72.9-92.5) cases-MDD in 15 (25.0%, 95% CI = 15.1-38.1), anxiety disorders in 6 (10%, 95% CI = 4.1-21.2), and adjustment disorder in 32 (53.3%, 95% CI = 40.1-66.1) cases each. No statistically significant association was observed between DV and any of the psychiatric disorders. However, DVQ scores showed significant correlation with years of marriage (Pearson's r = 0.268, P < 0.05) and with stressful life events over the past 1 year (Pearson's r = 0.424, P < 0.05). Conclusions: High rates of DV and psychological morbidity were seen in spouses of alcohol-dependent males.

Introduction

Violence against women is a major human rights abuse and an important public health concern. The World Health Organization (WHO) Multi-country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence found the lifetime prevalence of physical and/or sexual partner violence among ever-partnered women in 15 countries to range from 15% to 71% and it was found to be 4%-54% in the past year.[1] A multisite household survey conducted in India found that about 26% of women reported physical violence in the past 12 months.[2] In this study, among urban nonslum sites, the highest prevalence rates for physical and psychological violence (43.1% and 61.6%, respectively) were reported from Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala.[2] Various studies have found that partner alcohol abuse was associated with an increased risk of intimate partner violence (IPV) in women.[3],[4],[5] A study conducted in Pune, India, had assessed IPV using a 4-item questionnaire which assessed physical and emotional abuse, but not sexual violence.[5]

Spousal domestic violence (DV) against women is reported to have far-reaching mental health implications in the victims. Depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, self-harm, and sleep disorders are well documented to be mental health sequelae of IPV.[6],[7] The Study of Abuse in the Family Environment (India-SAFE) reported that alcohol consumption by husband and exposure to physical violence were significantly associated with an increased risk of poor mental health in women. Psychological morbidity was not evaluated objectively, but assessed using a self-reported questionnaire in this study.[8] A study done in Palakkad, Kerala, found that DV was reported by almost two-thirds of spouses of alcohol-dependent males attending a tertiary care center, but the questionnaire used to assess DV was not validated in the local language. On clinical evaluation, two-thirds of these spouses had clinical depression and 11% had suicidal thoughts.[9] In another study, sixty spouses of men with alcohol dependence (AD) were assessed using a structured clinical interview schedule. They found that 65% of the participants had a psychiatric disorder; mood and anxiety disorders were the most common problems reported.[10] A population-based survey done in northern part of Goa assessed women aged 18-49 years using General Health Questionnaire and reported that excessive partner alcohol use led to a two- to three-fold increase in risk for common mental disorders. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Experience of Domestic Violence and Psychological Morbidity in Spouses of Alcohol-Dependent Males
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.