Youth Identities and Social Transformations in Modern Indonesia

By Dewi, Anita | Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, June 2018 | Go to article overview

Youth Identities and Social Transformations in Modern Indonesia


Dewi, Anita, Journal of Southeast Asian Studies


Youth identities and social transformations in modern Indonesia

Edited by KATHRYN ROBINSON

Leiden: Brill, 2016. Pp. xv + 271. Figures, Tables, Illustrations, Index.

doi:10.1017/S0022463418000085

Discussion and debate on youth across different areas, topics, and scales in different social, political, cultural and geographical locations have always been enlightening. While Youth identities and social transformation in modern Indonesia will be of great value for experts in the area, it is also a digestible read for the wider public. This is definitely an advantage that is not easily found in every book written about youth, as in most cases they are either purely academic or simply popular in presentation. The book's six thematic parts, each consisting of two chapters, are logically structured. The scope of areas is relatively broad yet well targeted, starting from how youth is situated and understood in Indonesia to more detailed aspects of youth identities in relation to society.

In addressing the big picture of Indonesia's youth, White's chapter presents a comparative perspective on generational and social change. In his chapter, White proposes the need to focus on youth as an entity in itself, rather than seeing it purely as a transition from childhood to adulthood. Unfortunately, to date youth has often been defined 'by what it is not' (p. 5). Under the same theme, Nilan et al. address trends and inequalities in youth transitions, noting that what happens in the Indonesian context does not necessarily mirror that in developed Western countries. Across Nilan's nine study sites, Indonesian participants were found to have similar views on significant factors in their lives, namely education, family, faith, health and homeownership.

The second theme, on education, begins with White and Margiyatin's chapter on teenagers in a Javanese village. Their study found that masa remaja (adolescence) is seen as triggering tensions between generations. There were also very strong external influences on teenagers' search for identity. One of these is indicated by the way social discrimination between boys and girls is 'widely understood in a general or abstract way but matched with continued discrimination in day-to-day life' (p. 66). Freedom, on the other hand, is not seen as an essential element of identity formation.

A study on transitions elsewhere is also presented. In her study, Robinson found that education is seen as the main factor in achieving successful transitions to adulthood in Sorowako (South Sulawesi). Decisions are mainly made by parents and their children, but they are dictated by social norms. Both economic benefits and modernity have been held as proof of good education. An interesting paradox found in this study is that while the rationale for sending children to Java for higher education is for them to learn to be independent, they typically remain fully financially dependent on their parents throughout (p. 85).

Moving away from education, the third theme deals with friendship, growing up and peer surveillance. In her research on young Minangkabau and their friendships, Parker addresses a very interesting concept of friends in Indonesia. The literal translation of 'friend', that is teman or kawan, simply means 'people who are actually related in a very shallow way' (p. 98). 'Teman curhat', however, indicates a friend who acts as 'a safety valve and a moral barometer and guide' (p. 110). This kind of friend is placed on the highest level of friendship as he/she does not only support or give comfort, but also provides an opportunity for sharing and expressing selves in a very close manner.

The next chapter by Semedi demonstrates how the youth group Pramuka has been strategically used as a political vehicle over the years. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Youth Identities and Social Transformations in Modern Indonesia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.