Innovations in News: Often a Foreign Affair

By Stone, Martha L. | Editor & Publisher, May 1, 1999 | Go to article overview

Innovations in News: Often a Foreign Affair


Stone, Martha L., Editor & Publisher


When asked what innovations will most benefit the newspaper industry in the years to come, editors and publishers around the globe name the Web and multimedia applications first. That's the word from an international newspaper consulting firm that has identified nine important business and content developments for the future of newspapers worldwide. The group will present a 100-page report at the World Newspaper Congress and the World Editors Forum in Zurich in June.

InnovAtion, the consultant group based in Pamplona, Spain, and Detroit, conducted the survey of 120 high-profile newspaper publishers and editors from 33 countries. "All over the world, the situation is depressing, especially in developed countries, in terms of circulation, advertising [lineage], and reader satisfaction," says Juan Antonio Giner, a founder of InnovAtion. "This is a positive survey because we found cases of excellence newspapers doing well."

Giner hopes that the study will enlighten leaders at newspapers worldwide to try new techniques and technologies. "The newspaper industry around the world is very parochial," Giner says. "They don't look around. What we are trying to show is you can learn a lot from newspapers in other countries."

Ranked as the highest innovation in the survey was the multimedia newsroom that integrates newspaper, radio, TV, cable, and online services. Publishers and editors who responded thought this innovation had the strongest promise for the future.

Second among top innovations were new Web sites that enable papers to do more sophisticated investigative reporting, such as database searching.

The third most important trend was the expansion of content at The New York Times. "[The newspaper] is increasing the news hole, adding news supplements, and is more comprehensive," Giner says. "They are investing in expansion."

Close behind in survey rank was an experiment at the Los Angeles Times encouraging cooperation between marketing product managers and editors. But at least one respondent objected to the practice, calling it editorial "prostitution."

Tying for fourth place was the proliferation of in-house training programs for editorial staffers, a positive development in an industry that generally either overlooked training altogether, or only concentrated on the business side, not the editorial side of the aisle, Giner says.

In sixth place, respondents liked the daily feedback surveys from readers of some Latin American newspapers, in which reader panels of about 150 tell editors what they like and dislike about that day's paper. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Innovations in News: Often a Foreign Affair
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.