100 Women Who Helped to Change the World. Leading Ladies across History

The Mirror (London, England), August 10, 2018 | Go to article overview

100 Women Who Helped to Change the World. Leading Ladies across History


Byline: JULIE McCAFFREY

BBC History magazine readers voted for the 100 Women Who Changed the World and here they are

1 Marie Curie 1867-1934. Won Nobel Prize for radioactivity work.

2 Rosa Parks 1913-2005. US civil rights pioneer.

3 Emmeline Pankhurst 1858-1928 Votes for women leader.

4 Ada Lovelace 1815-1852 Hailed as the first computer programmer.

5 Rosalind Franklin 1920-1958 Co-discovered DNA double helix.

6 Margaret Thatcher 1925-2013 Britain's first female Prime Minister.

7 Angela Burdett-Coutts 1814-1906 Social equality campaigner.

8 Mary Wollstonecraft 1759-1797 Writer and founder of feminism.

9 Florence Nightingale 1820-1910 Crimean War nursing pioneer.

10 Marie Stopes 1880-1958 Family planning campaigner.

11 Eleanor of Aquitaine 1122-1204 Most powerful woman in Europe.

12 Virgin Mary 1st century.

13 Jane Austen 1775-1817 Iconic British novelist.

14 Boudicca 30 AD-60AD Ancient Celtic queen who fought Romans.

15 Diana, Princess of Wales 1961-1997 The people's princess.

16 Amelia Earhart 1897-1937 First female to fly solo across Atlantic.

17 Queen Victoria 1819-1901 Reigned for 64 years.

18 Josephine Butler 1828-1906 Women's education reformer.

19 Mary Seacole 1805-1881 Pioneering nurse in Crimean War.

20 Mother Teresa 1910-1997 Nun and missionary in Kolkata, India.

21 Mary Shelley 1797-1851 Her novel Frankenstein created sci-fi.

22 Catherine the Great 1729-1796 Russian Empress.

23 Vera Atkins 1908-2000 British WWII intelligence officer.

24 Cleopatra 69BC-30BC Ruler of Egypt, known for intellect.

25 Elizabeth Fry 1780-1845 Reforming "angel of prisons".

26 Mary Anning 1799-1847 Self-taught fossil hunter.

27 Joan of Arc 1412-1431 Led French to victory over English.

28 Isabella Castile 1451-1504 Queen who funded Columbus.

29 Catherine of Siena 1347-1380 Italian saint, mystic, feminist hero.

30 Wangari Maathai 1940-2011 Green Belt Movement founder.

31 Virgina Woolf 1882-1941 To the Lighthouse novelist.

32 Simone de Beauvoir 1908-1986 Feminist author.

33 Grace Hopper 1906-1992 Known as First Lady of Software.

34 Frida Kahlo 1907-1954 Inspiring Mexican artist.

35 Theodora 500-548 Byzantium empress and women's pioneer.

36 Hypatia 370-415 Egyptian first female mathematician.

37 Eleanor Rathbone 1872-1946 Campaigning MP.

38 Sacagawea 1788-1812 Native American who helped US explorers.

39 Nellie Bly 1864-1922 US reporter on cruel mental hospitals.

40 Lise Meitner 1878-1968 Physicist mother of the atom bomb.

41 Catherine de Medici 1519-1589 Powerful in 16th century France.

42 Isabella Bird 1831-1904 Victorian travel writer.

43 Bessie Coleman 1892-1926 Frst black female pilot in the US.

44 Aphra Behn 1640-1689 First woman writer in England.

45 Coco Chanel 1883-1971 Established fashion house.

46 Artemisia Gentileschi 1593-1653 Italian Baroque painter.

47 Zora Neale Hurston 1891-1960 American black writer.

48 Katharine Graham 1917-2001 Washington Post publisher.

49 Indira Ghandi 1917-1984 India's only female Prime Minister.

50 Gabriela Mistral 1889-1957 Chilean poet and Nobel laureate.

51 Clara Barton 1821-1912 Civil War nurse, founder of US Red Cross.

52 Anna Akhmatova 1889-1966 Rated Russia's best female writer. …

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