The Word on Wine

By Moore, Victoria | New Statesman (1996), May 3, 1999 | Go to article overview

The Word on Wine


Moore, Victoria, New Statesman (1996)


These days there is such a proliferation of terms to describe wine that the layman may be forgiven for taking a sip of Chateau-Lafite and giving rein to a burst of stream-of-consciousness nonsense. "Barrowloads of apples," he might proclaim without the least idea that he was getting it all wrong, "aroma of smouldering tyres, ah yes, and there's a touch of over-ripe yarn in the bouquet and a tinge of red plague-sore circa 1666 in the legs."

Winespeak has got so hyperbolic it's easy to believe that no one knows what they're talking about. But they do. Describing wine is a science and an art; a whole, complex, utterly precise vocabulary has developed around it. Thousands, of ordinary words such as "strawberry" and "cedar" have been hijacked for the purpose of describing the stuff in your glass.

Sometimes I long for the days when wine books might advise in simple terms, not unlike George Rainbird's 1963 Pocket Book of Wine: "You will, I hope, have noticed," he says about halfway through the book, "that I try to avoid what I call wine jargon." Instead he holds forth in an avuncular, cravat-ish way: "This one is very good," he will say, before going on to discuss "the charming wines of the Loire".

So when did we become so fulsomely precise in our wine terminology? One wine expert I have spoken to thinks the habit of talking about wine in terms of sundry fruit, flowers and vegetables has become much more widely disseminated in the past 30 years, but he refers me to an obscure book, revered by wine connoisseurs and, though still in print, difficult to get hold of. It is The Taste of Wine by Emile Peynaud.

Peynaud knows everything. He says that people began to talk about wine when it was first drunk. Greek literature boasts about 100 terms used to describe wine. He notes that "in 1415 wines were already being described as 'good, clean, honest and commercial'," which sounds terribly modern. Yet many writers paid more attention to drunkenness and wine's effect on the senses. Francois Rabelais, master of language and the innovative turn of phrase, constantly praised wine but never once attempted to describe its taste. …

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