Parikka, Jussi. What Is Media Archaeology?

Communication Research Trends, June 2015 | Go to article overview

Parikka, Jussi. What Is Media Archaeology?


Parikka, Jussi. What Is Media Archaeology? Cambridge UK and Malden, MA: Polity Press, 2012. Pp. viii, 205. ISBN 978-0-7456-5025-8 (cloth) $69.95; 978-0-7456-5026-5 (paper) $24.95.

U.S.-based communication researchers will find this book a good introduction to media archaeology, an approach to communication rooted primarily in Europe and in some areas of German communication study. The book itself "sets out to elaborate the potentials of the media-archaeological method in digital culture research" (p. 2). Parikka asks:

   Where do you start when you begin thinking
   media archaeologically? Do you start with past
   media, like a "proper" historian? Or from our
   own current world of media devices, software,
   platforms, networks, social media, plasma
   screens, and such, like a "proper" analyst of digital
   culture would? Ths proposition of this book
   is that you start in the middle--from the entanglement
   of past and present, and accept the complexity
   this decision brings with it to any analysis
   of modern media culture. (p. 5)

Media archaeology takes its origin from several different sources. First, it draws on the work of Michel Foucault whose use of the very term archaeology provides one point of origin. Here the interest lies in discovering relationships of power, particularly those that have become hidden in past practices and that influence the present. Parikka is interested in how these past practices influence contemporary culture. He writes, "media archaeology is introduced as a way to investigate the new media cultures through insights from past new media, often with an emphasis on the forgotten, the quirky, the non-obvious apparatuses, practices, and inventions" (p. 2).

In addition to this strand taking its lead from Foucault, media archaeology also looks literally at the history of communication technology and the ways in which various technologies have succeeded one another, examining how older technologies have shaped the use of, and our understanding of, new technologies. A source for this approach to media archaeology comes from the New Film History movement in the 1980s. According to Parikka, key themes that emerge from these theoretical approaches and that shape media archaeology are "(1) modernity, (2) cinema, (3) histories of the present, and (4) alternative histories" (p. 7). Parikka adds, "what this book develops are insights into how arts and technology can work in relation to cultural theory--and articulate history, practice, and theory in a fruitful mash-up" (p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Parikka, Jussi. What Is Media Archaeology?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.