'Gender Equality in Workplace Benefits Men as Well as Women' Helen Antoniazzi Is Strategic Lead for Policy and Communications for Charity Chwarae Teg. in the Wake of New Research about How Men Perceive Equality, She Says More Has to Be Done to Achieve Gender Equality

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), August 23, 2018 | Go to article overview

'Gender Equality in Workplace Benefits Men as Well as Women' Helen Antoniazzi Is Strategic Lead for Policy and Communications for Charity Chwarae Teg. in the Wake of New Research about How Men Perceive Equality, She Says More Has to Be Done to Achieve Gender Equality


GENDER equality is often thought of as a "woman's issue" - an issue that benefits women and women only. But that's not the case.

There's a growing body of evidence that shows that gender equality in the workplace generates economic growth and productivity.

The most recent modelling for the UK, carried out by McKinsey and Co. in 2016, estimates that PS150bn could be added onto UK GDP forecasts by 2025 by taking steps to close gender gaps.

Furthermore, from our experience of working with businesses to improve gender equality, we know that many of the measures that can be implemented, such as more flexible working practices, improved shared parental leave options, and better workplace communications, benefit male workers as much as they do women.

To effectively tackle inequality in the workplace, we have to change the gendered nature of workplace cultures.

To do so, men have a crucial role to play, particularly in sectors where they make up the majority of the workforce.

Furthermore, as men are more likely to occupy senior decisionmaking positions throughout the labour market, they will often be the ones to decide whether tackling gender inequality is a priority, and which activities will be undertaken.

In light of the important role that men have to play, Chwarae Teg wanted to better understand how men perceive gender equality in the workplace.

This week we publish a report which aims to start a conversation about men's perceptions and to provide an initial insight into how men working in a number of key sectors in Wales view gender equality and how they experience working with women.

Commissioned as part of Chwarae Teg's Agile Nation 2 project, which is part-funded by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government, our research explored the views of men working in the construction, energy and environment, ICT, and advanced materials and manufacturing sectors.

The research shows that men's views of gender equality are complex.

Many men in Welsh workplaces aren't as aware of the extent to which inequality still impacts on women's working lives; 31% of men who responded said that they believe that gender equality has been achieved, compared to 13% of the women. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

'Gender Equality in Workplace Benefits Men as Well as Women' Helen Antoniazzi Is Strategic Lead for Policy and Communications for Charity Chwarae Teg. in the Wake of New Research about How Men Perceive Equality, She Says More Has to Be Done to Achieve Gender Equality
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.