Export Opportunities: Exhibitions and Trade Shows

By Taylor, Julian | The Middle East, March 1999 | Go to article overview

Export Opportunities: Exhibitions and Trade Shows


Taylor, Julian, The Middle East


Trade fairs and exhibitions have become the mega-marketing tool of the 20th century, unsurpassed as a means of promoting products and increasing exports in the international arena. Exhibitions of a wide diversity of products, including arms, construction materials, jewellery, petrochemicals, telecommunications systems and business and financial services, are among some of the main attractions to be staged in the Middle East this year. But the trade fairs and exhibitions business is by no means a one way street, as scores of foreign companies travel to the Middle East to display their wares, dozens of Arab exhibitors are travelling in the opposite direction, competing with international producers in a variety of markets.

London-based Overseas Exhibition Services, which have been around in one form or another since 1895, pioneered trade fairs and exhibitions in the Middle East region back in the 1970s. Gerry Dobson, a director of Overseas Exhibitions and Services with responsibility for the Middle East region, recalled how, during the mid-1970s, the opportunities for doing business in the Middle East were almost limitless. "The price of oil was over $30 a barrel and the producing nations were awash with petrodollars," recalled Mr Dobson.

Entire infrastructures were being established in most of the Gulf states, including schools, roads, hospitals and telecommunications networks. Overseas Exhibition Services launched itself into the regional market with a building show in Bahrain. This was followed by a telecommunications event and later the first in what was to become a series of Middle East Oil Shows (MEOS), the 11th of which was held in Bahrain at the end of February, attracting visitors from government and private sector institutions from around the region.

In the 1970s, as Overseas Exhibition Services' Gerry Dobson recalled, there were none of the multi-million dollar exhibition centres boasted by most of the major cities of the Gulf in the 1990s. "Our first exhibitions were held in a series of tented structures in Bahrain. Later, we were invited to move into the municipal market halls in the centre of the city." Eventually, obviously recognising the potential offered by hosting such events, the government decided to build the Bahrain International Exhibition Centre, today one of the most modern in the Arab world.

While interest in some sectors has grown and developed, others have assumed a diminishing importance in international markets.

Now each Gulf state has its own cement construction industry, with all the related spin offs, all but the largest building trade fairs have given way to exhibitions featuring, for example, the latest in the fast moving telecommunications industry.

This year Overseas Exhibition Services will run a number of trade shows in Bahrain, among them Middle East Broadcast 99 in March, for the radio, television and programming industry and Jewellery Arabia 99 in November.

While Overseas Exhibition Services is happy to utilise the facilities offered by Bahrain, these days many Arab states are in strong competition for exhibition, conference and trade fair business. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Export Opportunities: Exhibitions and Trade Shows
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.