EVIDENCE of American POWs in the Soviet Union: In May, Pentagon Officials Claimed They Had No Evidence Showing That Korean War-Era U.S. Soldiers Were Imprisoned by the Soviet Union-A Statement That Was a Lie

By Kirkwood, R. Cort | The New American, September 3, 2018 | Go to article overview

EVIDENCE of American POWs in the Soviet Union: In May, Pentagon Officials Claimed They Had No Evidence Showing That Korean War-Era U.S. Soldiers Were Imprisoned by the Soviet Union-A Statement That Was a Lie


Kirkwood, R. Cort, The New American


A little more than a month after President Donald Trump met with North Korea's Kim Jong-un, the communist dictator's regime sent home 55 coffins supposedly containing the remains of American MIAs from the Korean War. On August 1 at Pearl Harbor, Vice President Mike Pence received the fragments of what presumably are American GIs, Marines, and aviators, who now await identification.

At least some of the families of America's missing men from the Korean War hope they might finally bury, 65 years later, long-dead loved ones on American soil.

But identification won't be easy, if what is past is prologue. As the New York Times reported, forensic examiners have identified only a little more than one-third of 50 sets of remains that came home in the past. "The rest sit in storage."

Bones are mixed together, the Times reported, and the "208 coffins delivered in the 1990s turned out to include remains from at least 400 people." The "remains" of a British aviator sent home to his family were dog parts.

Yet no matter how many remains the forensic gumshoes do identify, a sad fact remains: Some of the remains of the nearly 8,000 men missing in action might never come home, at least until Russia and the United States admit that American POWs in Korea were packed off to the Soviet Union.

No "Evidence"

And on that note, hope dims. As the Washington Free Beacon reported just after President Donald Trump was elected, U.S. officials have denied to Soviet officials having any evidence that the Soviets took Americans during the Korean War:

   Pentagon officials leading efforts to
   recover missing American service
   members told their Russian counterparts
   in May there is no evidence
   that U.S. prisoners of the Korean War
   were brought into the Soviet Union,
   dismissing intelligence reports and
   eyewitness testimony compiled over
   the last two decades.

   American officials made the claim
   during a May meeting of the U.S.-Russia
   Joint Commission on POW/
   MIAs, and experts say it could undermine
   the Defense Department's
   efforts to recover further information
   about the more than 7,800 military
   personnel still unaccounted for
   from the Korean War of the 1950s.
   Michael Linnington, who until recently
   directed the Defense POW/MIA
   Accounting Agency, or DPAA, told
   Russian officials participating in the
   forum that the Pentagon has "no evidence"
   that missing troops ended up
   in the Soviet Union by way of China.

   Linnington's comments angered experts
   who say the move will signal to
   the Russians that the U.S. government
   is no longer interested in pursuing a
   lead that it has chased for decades.

   Another official said families are
   susceptible to "survivor myth" as a
   "coping mechanism" to handle the
   emotional and psychological difficulties
   of having lost a loved one who
   never returned.

The problem with that claim is that it contradicts hard evidence to the contrary. In other words, the evidence refutes the claim that the government has no evidence.

As the POW Investigative Project website states, "According to former senior Soviet military officers, prisoners released from the Gulag, and multiple declassified wartime reports from the U.S. CIA and other intelligence organizations, numerous Americans captured during the Korean War were sent to the Soviet Union. Some, such as pilots, were shipped directly to the Soviet Union. Others went via ship or through China in rail cars, which were reported by a number of witnesses along their route."

   In 1954, the US State Department
   even asked the Soviet Union to return
   these American POWS: "The United
   States Government has recently received
   reports which support earlier
   indications that American prisoners
   of war who had seen action in Korea
   have been transported to the Union
   of Soviet Socialist Republics and that
   they are now in Soviet custody. … 

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