Just 4 White Supremacists Show for March; Ramsey Fumes

By Mizejewski, Gerald | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 8, 1999 | Go to article overview

Just 4 White Supremacists Show for March; Ramsey Fumes


Mizejewski, Gerald, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Four protesters showed up for a much-publicized white supremacist march on the White House yesterday, prompting police to disband a mobilization of nearly 1,500 officers at the last minute.

Sign-waving religious and ethnic groups preparing to rally against the march instead celebrated in the streets, banging on pots and cheering loudly.

But Metropolitan Police Chief Charles H. Ramsey was not pleased. He is asking the city to file suit against organizers from the American Nationalist Party, also known as the Knights of Freedom. He estimated the buildup cost was about $1 million.

"I think they owe it to the taxpayers of the city," said Chief Ramsey, who learned the neo-Nazi rally had been scrapped about a half-hour before the expected 3 p.m. start. "They ought to pay for it."

Officials expected between 150 and 300 white nationalists, Klansmen and skinheads to march from James Monroe Park near George Washington University to the White House. When officers headed 60 miles south of the District to meet the marchers, only four showed up.

Jeff Krause, executive vice president of the neo-Nazi group, blamed news reports for blowing things out of proportion, the Associated Press reported. "We did not want any of our people hurt." He also said that whoever did show up was not affiliated with his group.

The planned march inspired three counterrallies, one of which featured speeches by D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton and Mayor Anthony A. Williams at the Lincoln Memorial.

"Even at the close of the millennium, [supremacists] still cling to the hopeless belief that skin color gives them a mandate to attack, marginalize and exclude those who are different," Mr. Williams said.

A loud cheer resonated through the west end of the Mall when news of the aborted march reached the Lincoln Memorial demonstration.

"I'm really relieved to hear that," said Megan Contakes, 29, of Alexandria. "It takes a lot of steam out of the hate movement. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Just 4 White Supremacists Show for March; Ramsey Fumes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.