Microsoft Sues over Pirated Software

The Florida Times Union, April 30, 1999 | Go to article overview

Microsoft Sues over Pirated Software


TAMPA -- Microsoft Corp. is suing 15 Florida companies, alleging that they sold counterfeit versions of Windows 95, Windows 98, and other company software.

Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft is the world's dominant maker of personal computer software. Its Windows operating system runs the basic functions of 90 percent of the world's personal computers.

The lawsuits filed in federal courts seek unspecified damages and a judge's order to stop distribution of the software, corporate attorney Nick Psyhogeos said Wednesday.

They come at a time when technology crimes are on the rise throughout Florida, according to police quoted in a company release.

"We're finding a substantial increase of technology-related crime in the state," said Phil Ramer, director of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement's Office of Statewide Intelligence. "Organized crime rings have begun to include software piracy in their roster of other illegal activities because of the large sums of money that they stand to make."

Businesses, consumers and the government are the ones who suffer, company executives said.

Software piracy cost Florida 7,186 jobs in 1997 and $490 million in lost wages, tax revenue and retail sales, said Psyhogeos, citing a Microsoft-commissioned study from International Planning & Research Corp., a market research company.

And counterfeit software, which often has viruses and bugs, does not come with technical support or warranty protection, and consumers aren't eligible for software upgrades.

The lawsuits filed yesterday were against companies in Tampa, Orlando, Miami and eight other cities in Central and South Florida, one of the company's largest anti-piracy initiatives in a single state, executives said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Microsoft Sues over Pirated Software
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.