Teaching: Unfolds Numerous Career Options for African-American College Graduates

By Brown, Gilbert | Diversity Employers, February 1999 | Go to article overview

Teaching: Unfolds Numerous Career Options for African-American College Graduates


Brown, Gilbert, Diversity Employers


Changing demographic patterns contribute to African-American college graduates being strategically positioned to rapidly enter the K-12 teaching profession in the next millennium. Veteran teachers (25-30 years of instructional experience) will be retiring from the teaching profession in greater numbers in the next millennium. Disproportionately, African-American teachers will be leaving the teaching profession. What factors are driving this trend? Many of the African-American teachers entered the profession during an era when African-American graduates had fewer career options than their counterparts today. Graduates discovered career options as K-12 teachers in de facto (in reality) and de jure (by law) school systems. Also some graduates thought of teaching as a natural career to position them for collaborating with young people and using education as a social escalator to improve their life stations. Consequently, the combined impact of the two factors contributes to school districts facing major challenges trying to recruit and retain outstanding African-American educators.

Next, the changing K-12 student demographics from predominately white to more students of color (Hispanics, Asians, and African Africans) contrast sharply with the increasing white female composition of the teaching profession. A homogenous teaching cadre can result in one voice shaping the curriculum and developing pedagogy (teaching styles) for an emerging, racially-diverse K-12 student population. Expanding the pool of African-American (females and males) teachers will include more voices into shaping the curriculum and incorporating holistic pedagogical styles for a racially-diverse student population.

For those of you graduating with degrees in education and those without education degrees interested in teaching, the future is promising. Because of current teachers' retirements, an increasing student population and a demand for teachers in specialized areas, some foresee a national shortage of teachers in the next few years. Teachers of color will be in particular demand because of the changing racial and ethnic demographics of the country. "By employing highly successful and capable people of color, schools destroy prejudicial attitudes on the part of white students and parents and establish a standard to which African-American students can aspire," said Dr. H. Douglas Williams, superintendent of Schools of Perry Township in central Indiana. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts the United States will need 20% more K-elementary schoolteachers and 5% more secondary education schoolteachers by the year 2005. This increase comes at a time when more African-American students and fewer white students are entering elementary school. What does this increase mean for you now? It means you should schedule an appointment with your advisor and make sure you are on track for graduation with the type of license or certificate you expect to receive, or it means you should consider a career in the teaching profession. "We need more teachers of color because of their passion for students of color. Because educators of color often possess a special passion for African-American students, they provide a desperately needed support base in schools for those students. In addition, when their perspective is shared with white educators, it enables those white educators to become more effective in working with African-American students," Dr. Williams said. This article will help you prepare for life after graduation, and it will also make you think about why more people of color must consider careers in teaching.

Why is it important for you to clarify the type of license or certificate you will have when you graduate? The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards has recently distinguished licensure and certification. "Educators argue that states license (e.g. architects, nurses, etc.) and that specialized boards in the respective fields certify. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Teaching: Unfolds Numerous Career Options for African-American College Graduates
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.