Who Is Adding Jobs Main Street Florida Responsible for Most of Second-Quarter Gain

By Mathis, Karen Brune | The Florida Times Union, July 21, 1999 | Go to article overview

Who Is Adding Jobs Main Street Florida Responsible for Most of Second-Quarter Gain


Mathis, Karen Brune, The Florida Times Union


Our latest installment of "Who's Hiring?" found that at least 6,712 jobs could be added to Jacksonville payrolls if companies follow through with their second-quarter intentions.

This is our second attempt to answer the frequent question: "Do you have a list of all the new companies coming to town or a list of those expanding?"

Our debut report for the first quarter found that the city could gain 5,715 jobs if the 31 companies announcing additions or expansions followed through with their plans.

The second report tops that number by about 1,000 positions, but with fewer employers -- 27.

The big number for the quarter came thanks to Main Street Florida, which started site work in early June for a North Jacksonville shopping center that would create 4,930 full- and part-time jobs. It is expected to open in the fall of 2000.

As for layoffs, five companies announced or revealed closings or restructuring that affected 383 jobs in the second quarter, compared with 1,540 pending layoffs announced in the first quarter.

Our information came from applications filed with city and state regulatory agencies, announced expansions and reductions, the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, the Jacksonville Economic Development Commission and reporting by Times-Union business writers.

Caveats include the fact the survey is unscientific and does not cover every job addition planned. The growth is tied primarily to construction projects or plans, incentive requests, corporate acquisitions or formal announcements.

And while simply quadrupling the second-quarter net addition (6,329) or doubling the first-half net addition (10,504) would produce annual job-growth figures of 25,316 and 21,008, respectively, experts do not expect the first-half pace to continue through the end of the year.

In fact, according to state statistics, there were 17,200 jobs gained between May 1998 and May 1999.

Still, the pace isn't far from last year's 12-month gain of 22,000 jobs for 1998 in the four-county area, according to state statistics.

A closer look at the second-quarter numbers:

The majority of jobs pledged were restaurant and retail jobs. We counted 5,466 jobs, or 81.4 percent, came from eateries and stores, thanks to Main Street Florida. Another 15.4 percent, or 1,027, come in customer service, office, technology and professional jobs. The remaining 3.3 percent, or 219, were in industrial and warehouse companies.

As for location of the jobs, again Main Street Florida drove the percentage. Almost threequarters -- or 73.4 percent -- of the new jobs went to its North Jacksonville location. More than a fifth, 21.3 percent, went to Southside, 3.2 percent to Westside and 1.6 percent to the downtown Northbank and Southbank. (One company had not reported a location, so the percentages don't add to 100.)

As for location of the businesses, however, two-thirds -- or 18 of the 27 companies -- that have chosen sites are preferring Southside. Five, or 18.5 percent, are going to West Jacksonville. Three are downtown, and then there's the North Jacksonville mall.

Incentives played a big role in the biggest project -- Main Street Florida. The city agreed to give mall developers $17.5 million in property tax rebates over 15 years to help build roads. The only other project that requested any assistance was The Hartley Press application for access to an industrial revenue bond.

HITTING HOME

The Times-Union takes a comprehensive look at job announcements after each quarter.

SECOND-QUARTER JOB CUTS

Five firms announced job cuts in the second three months of 1999:

U.S. POSTAL SERVICE to close Jacksonville Mail Processing Center in May 2000, affecting 65 union workers to be reassigned and about 130 contract employees.

METHODIST MEDICAL CENTER laid off 30 people in May; University Medical Center laid off 58 in March. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Who Is Adding Jobs Main Street Florida Responsible for Most of Second-Quarter Gain
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.