Black Lawyer Quits Board amid Controversy Affirmative Action Program at Issue

The Florida Times Union, July 24, 1999 | Go to article overview

Black Lawyer Quits Board amid Controversy Affirmative Action Program at Issue


ATLANTA -- The only black person on the Southeastern Legal Foundation's legal advisory board has resigned amid a controversy over the conservative group's plans to sue Atlanta because of the city's affirmative action program.

Former U.S. Attorney Larry Thompson, a partner with the Atlanta law firm King & Spalding, said Thursday that his involvement with the group could conflict with his representation of clients.

Two members of the legal foundation's board of directors resigned earlier this week because of boycott threats stemming from the foundation's planned lawsuit.

Amos McMullian, chairman and chief executive of Flowers Industries, and William W. Sprague Jr., the retired chairman of Savannah Foods & Industries, stepped down after their companies' products were threatened with a boycott by the Georgia Black Chamber of Commerce.

A spokeswoman for McMullian called his resignation a business decision. William W. Sprague III, the retired chairman's son, said Wednesday his father's support of the legal foundation was personal and unrelated to the business. …

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