Designs Bedded Firmly in History

By Ralph; Kovel, Terry | The Florida Times Union, August 7, 1999 | Go to article overview

Designs Bedded Firmly in History


Ralph, Kovel, Terry, The Florida Times Union


Beds are made for comfort and health. Today's beds are large, and their mattresses are made to be comfortable, firm and good for the back. In past centuries, mattresses were made from cornhusks, straw or other lumpy materials that were stuffed into a cloth bag.

Tightly strung ropes that had to be re-tightened regularly supported the mattress. By the mid-1800s, wooden slats were used. It was not until the 1860s that box springs were used. The single bed of the past was much smaller than those seen today. A 19th-century double bed now seems far too narrow. Kingand queen-size beds are a mid-20th century idea.

In the 18th century, our ancestors were certain that night air caused disease. Beds were made with posts that ranged from 8 to 9 feet tall and with testers that could hold curtains.

The heavy curtains were drawn to keep out the night's impure air, gases and contagious effluvia. By the 1870s, the four-post bed was going out of style, and the half-tester replaced it. The tester top covered only the top half of the bed, but curtains still could enclose the bed. Sometimes the half-tester was attached to the ceiling.

By late Victorian times, scientists had convinced the housewife that the old rules were wrong and that the bedroom should be a model of cleanliness. Carpets and drapes held dust and disease, so they were removed. Open-work or plain, metal beds that could be washed and cleaned more thoroughly than high, carved, wooden beds were used. Bric-a-brac, pictures and extra furniture also attracted the bearers of disease and were kept out of the bedroom.

By the 1930s, scientists had again revised their ideas of a healthy sleeping room. Open windows, attractive furniture and carpets were back in style. Even the high-post tester bed returned for those who wanted an old-fashioned look.

Q: About 35 years ago, I inherited my grandmother's pendant necklace. In the box with it was a note describing the pendant as "apple green jadite." What's the difference between jadite and jade?

A: Jadite is one of two minerals called "jade." Carved pieces of jadite, which is found chiefly in Burma, are more valuable than carved nephrite, the other mineral called jade. Many think jade is always green, but it can also be white, red, brown or blue. Bright green is the most valuable color.

Q: I collect old medicine bottles. One of my veterinary medicine bottles is labeled "Dr. Hess Distemper Fever and Cough Remedy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Designs Bedded Firmly in History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.