Why DO So Many Young People Sneer at Britain?

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), September 23, 2018 | Go to article overview

Why DO So Many Young People Sneer at Britain?


Byline: GUEST COLUMNIST Charlotte Gill

SINCE the Salisbury poisonings, something has become horribly clear to me: Britain has lost its patriotism. I'm not talking about all of Britain, but my generation - the much-discussed millennials. Among people my own age (I'm 29) there has been barely a squeak of outrage over Russian agents poisoning people on British soil. In fact, in 2018 it's rare to hear any millennial talk about Britain unless they're being sniffy about it. If you want to gain kudos at the dinner parties I go to, just say something like 'Britain's broken', and everyone will probably clap.

I've actually heard several millennials say our country is as bad as Russia, almost causing me to spit out my avocado toast.

There are alarming numbers of young people who think Britain, capitalism and everything else associated with Western culture absolutely stinks.

Many now flirt with politics that threaten our country, with Marxist ideas increasing in popularity.

Some think it's time to give Communism another try. I say, like Elizabeth Taylor with marriage, it was doomed after the first go.

These ideological delusions are why few care that Jeremy Corbyn barely batted an eyelid over Salisbury, nor that his first instinct was to doubt British intelligence.

They love him because he promotes and perpetuates the millennial mindset of hating Britain, as well as mistrust over anything the Government says.

In January, a group of university students stormed into a Winston Churchill-themed cafe in London, shouting and telling the owners to change their 'offensive branding'. The owner said at the time: 'As far as I am concerned, if you cannot celebrate Britain and great Britons you are just erasing history'. Never mind that Churchill saved us from Hitler, these young people despise everything, and anyone, representing Britishness.

Of course, millennials aren't the first generation to be unpatriotic.

Back in the 1970s, punks called the monarchy a 'fascist regime'. And in 1933, students at the Oxford Union famously voted that 'this House will in no circumstances fight for its King and Country'.

But, when it came down to it, previous generations have been prepared to stick up for British values, even taking up arms when necessary. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Why DO So Many Young People Sneer at Britain?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.