Where Catholicism and Law Intersect

By Schaeffer, Pamela | National Catholic Reporter, August 13, 1999 | Go to article overview

Where Catholicism and Law Intersect


Schaeffer, Pamela, National Catholic Reporter


Notre Dame is a special place, I think," says M. Kathleen Kaveny, referring to the law school where she teaches. "It is a great, place to explore what it means to be a Catholic, a smart person and a lawyer at the end of the 20th century."

Kaveny, associate professor at the Notre Dame Law School, says she can't imagine having as much freedom at other law schools to think and write about questions at the intersection of Catholicism and law.

Notre Dame's longtime dean, David T. Link, plans to, carry the principles of Notre Dame's success to the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minn., where he has been appointed founding law school dean.

Kaveny graduated summa cum laude from Princeton in 1984, then earned a law degree and a Ph.D. in ethics from Yale. She worked as law clerk for John T. Noonan Jr., Catholic historian and U.S. appeals court judge in San Francisco. She also worked from 1992 to 1995 as an associate lawyer for Ropes & Gray in Boston, a firm specializing in health care law.

Now, Kaveny writes and speaks often on such legal-moral issues as assisted suicide, genetics and cloning. Besides bringing "a Catholic sensibility" to questions already under debate, Kaveny likes to raise new ones. For example, in Cleveland in March, she critiqued the concept of "billable hours" at a conference sponsored by the Cardinal Suenens Program in Theology and Church Life. Kaveny compared Catholicism's liturgical sense of time with the legal profession's practice of tracking time, even small units of time, and billing them to clients.

Kaveny sees widespread dissatisfaction expressed by young lawyers in surveys as the result not only of the long, isolating hours of work -- an average today in large firms of 10 hours a day, six days a week, Kaveny said -- but also of the way time is perceived and used in law offices. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Where Catholicism and Law Intersect
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.